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In an era in which the Internet and social media have completely disrupted long-established business models for the entire print industry, do newspapers anywhere have a long-term future?

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Activists want a date when the 88-year-old Waukegan coal-fired power plant will begin a transition to cleaner power. But NRG Energy says it's poured millions into pollution controls for the plant and has no plans to close.

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The saga over the sprawling Old Main Post Office is heating up. Mayor Rahm Emanuel recently started threatening to seize the building from the British developer who purchased it in 2009. Now comes word the building is about to be sold to a new owner.   

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Three hundred workers at Chicago's Nabisco bakery faced layoffs on Monday, with more cuts looming. We take a look at how the neighborhood is coping – and the future of manufacturing in Chicago.

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Mark Hoplamazian

Chicago-based hotel and hospitality company Hyatt Hotels Corporation has partnered with online education provider Khan Academy to bring a free and innovative digital learning challenge to Chicago. Joining us to talk about the program is Mark Hoplamazian, CEO and President of Hyatt.

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Attorney General Lisa Madigan

For the eighth year in a row, consumer debt topped Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan’s annual top 10 consumer complaints list. And for the first year, education-related complaints make the top 10 list.

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Crain’s Chicago Business managing editor Ann Dwyer takes a closer look at why the Old Main Post Office may be the target of a city of Chicago eminent domain takeover and other business headlines.

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The Citizens Utility Board and Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan have accused Peoples Gas of deliberately misleading regulators about the ballooning cost of a huge program to upgrade gas lines around Chicago. Tonight, we discuss the safety upgrades, the program's estimated cost and the claims about the company's actions with representatives from CUB and Peoples Gas.

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Chicago may be home to many Fortune 500 companies, but are corporate headquarters here shrinking? We get the latest from Crain's Chicago Business.

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Chicago is seeing a rise in high-rise construction with 34 new buildings over 200 feet tall currently under construction. That number has doubled in the last 15 months. What’s causing the sky-high building boom? Curbed Chicago editor AJ LaTrace joins "Chicago Tonight" to explain.

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United may be in for a bumpy ride if activist investors get their way, and a new low-cost grocery store from Whole Foods is coming to Evergreen Park. Those stories and more from Crain's Chicago Business deputy managing editor Ann Dwyer.

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For many young men, their first car is also their first love. But for some of Chicago's at-risk teens and young adults their first car isn't theirs to drive–but theirs to fix. Learning classic car restoration is more than just a trade, it's a chance to pave a new future. Brandis Friedman has the story.

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(thetaxhaven / Flickr)

It was a wild day for the markets. Stocks plummeted deeply this morning—then bounced back a bit in the afternoon. Crain's Chicago Business columnist Joe Cahill joins “Chicago Tonight” with the latest on what has been the worst yearly start for the markets on record.

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Ann Dwyer

The owners of the Cubs are buying three more rooftops with a Wrigley Field view. Joining us with more on that story and other local business news is Crain’s Chicago Business deputy managing editor Ann Dwyer.

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In 2013, Harold Pollack came up with a nine-point index card of common sense financial advice after a conversation with journalist Helaine Olen. Now, the two have expanded the card slightly into a book designed to put the average person on the road to financial well-being. Pollack joins “Chicago Tonight” to discuss the book.

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(Ken Teegardin / Flickr)

The stock market took a tumble Thursday as China’s stock market dropped 7 percent overnight and crude oil prices dropped to their lowest level in more than a decade. But what does that mean for investment portfolios? “Chicago Tonight” talks with three financial experts.