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Cincinnati giant Kroger puts Mariano's on its grocery list, McDonald's has a new recipe for success and Macy's is exploring a State Street redevelopment. Joining us with these stories and more is Crain's Chicago Business deputy managing editor Ann Dwyer.

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Oscar Mayer is making cold cuts as Kraft Heinz moves its headquarters to Chicago. Tesla may soon be cruising the Mag Mile; while Groupon looks to reverse its fortunes with a new CEO. Joining us with these stories and more is Crain's Chicago Business deputy managing editor Ann Dwyer.

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After a monthslong shutdown following an embankment collapse, the CTA Yellow Line will reopen Friday and provide free rides from its Dempster-Skokie and Oakton stations, the CTA announced.

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The Bears and City Hall strike a deal on the Lucas Museum, Chicago-based Walgreens wants to buy a rival and the Bulls go international for sponsorship deals. We’ll discuss these stories and other top business headlines of the week with Crain’s Chicago Business deputy managing editor Ann Dwyer.

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The Cubs playoff run has been a ratings boon, but what about the economic impact to Chicago? Meanwhile, Chicago-based United Airlines continues its CEO shuffle and McDonald’s franchisees aren't loving all-day breakfast service, as some chains energize Monster sales. Ann Dwyer of Crain’s Chicago Business gives us the story behind these headlines and more.

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Playboy magazine has decided that sex no longer sells. This February's issue will be the last  one containing naked pictures of women. Is Playboy's new no-nudity media strategy leaving their business model exposed?

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The two biggest stories in sports news lately have been the Chicago Cubs and the controversy over online fantasy sports. What are your chances of getting a ticket to a playoff game at Wrigley Field and what will it cost you? And what exactly is fantasy sports—is it gambling and should it be banned or regulated? Join us for a discussion on these topics and more.

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New York-based Condé Nast purchases Chicago’s Pitchfork Media, while Playboy magazine announces it will no longer publish nude photographs starting next year. Crain’s Chicago Business deputy managing editor Ann Dwyer talks about these and other top business headlines of the week. 

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The Thompson Center is for sale. Gov. Rauner says the iconic building has become a costly and inefficient albatross for Illinois. Just how much can the state get for it, and what does the renowned architect who designed it have to say about its future?

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A new energy initiative is encouraging area residents to get smart—by purchasing so-called smart thermostats–under a new rebate program that aims to cut heating costs. Will homeowners warm up to what is planned to be the country's largest smart energy initiative? We'll discuss the ambitious program with our panel of guests.

Crain’s Roundup with Ann Dwyer

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Crain’s Chicago Business deputy managing editor Ann Dwyer examines the bustling 26th street shopping corridor, the impact six new buildings would have on the city’s skyline and more.

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Robert B. Reich (Perian Flaherty)

There's no such thing as a true free market: That's the bold proposition former Labor Secretary Robert Reich makes in his newly released book, "Saving Capitalism." He joins “Chicago Tonight” to talk about how he hopes to change the conversation and save capitalism.

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As the Cubs head into the playoffs for the first time since 2008, the team is seeing an almost 12 percent increase in attendance. What effect might this have on future ticket prices? Crain’s Chicago Business deputy managing editor Ann Dwyer sheds light on this story and others with Eddie Arruza.

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The plastic bag ordinance that took effect Aug. 1 may not be having the impact that was intended, as retailers begin to offer thicker plastic bags in place of the older, thinner ones. Environmentalists say that alternatives exist, while retailers insist their customers prefer plastic. However, there may be a way to reduce plastic bag use that both environmentalists and retailers can agree on. Brandis Friedman has the story.

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Bethany McLean (Third Way Think Tank / Flickr)

Chicago-based business writer Bethany McLean makes the case that mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac are in a precarious state in her new book, "Shaky Ground: The Strange Saga of the U.S. Mortgage Giants." She'll explain what failure could mean for American mortgage holders when she joins us Monday on "Chicago Tonight."

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Crain's Chicago Business deputy managing editor Ann Dwyer takes a closer look at the top business stories of the week, including Motorola Solutions' announcement that it will move from the suburbs to downtown, and news of a developer eyeing the Old Chicago Main Post Office.