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The Dow Jones took a nosedive this morning, dropping more than 1,000 points when trading opened. The markets recovered some of their losses, but investors still appear rattled by disappointing economic news from China. We'll hear what to expect in the days to come and how it might affect your day-to-day life from three economic experts.

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Ann Dwyer

Crain’s Chicago Business deputy managing editor Ann Dwyer takes a closer look at McDonald’s Wall Street bounce, recently announced job cuts at Walgreens, the mass exodus of corporate jobs from Chicago, and Amazon’s Chicago expansion. 

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Shanghai's Pudong district in January 2014.

For the third day in a row, China devalued its currency. That devaluation led to jitters in financial markets around the globe. Since Monday, the Dow Jones alone has fallen 500 points. Join us for a panel discussion on the economy with Michael Miller, associate professor at the Driehaus College of Buisiness at DePaul University; and Edward Stuart, professor emeritus of economics at Northeastern Illinois University.

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Kraft Heinz cuts more than a third of its workforce, the NFL Draft will return to Chicago, and tech giant, Apple, will move its Michigan Avenue store further south along the Mag Mile. Crain's Chicago Business deputy managing editor Ann Dwyer talks with Chicago Tonight about some of the biggest business stories this week.

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Alderman Looks to Close Loopholes on Ban Starting Aug. 1

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The city of Chicago's partial ban on plastic bags is now in place, but the ordinance as it's currently written will still allow stores to give out plastic bags, provided they meet certain standards. We discuss the new rules and proposed changes to them.

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Some bad news for anyone searching for a Chicago apartment: Rents are going up, and in some places, dramatically. We talk about the factors behind the rent hikes with our panel.

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The watchdog group Citizens Utility Board on Wednesday alerted Chicago customers to upcoming changes to their power bills and offered tips for avoiding bad deals.

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Crain’s Chicago Business senior reporter Steve Daniels takes a closer look at the soaring cost of Peoples Gas' massive gas main replacement program and higher charges coming to Commonwealth Edison customers.

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We talk with Crain's Chicago Business Deputy Managing Editor Ann Dwyer about some of the biggest business stories this week, from Aon Center being sold to Caterpillar looking to Cuba to boost sluggish sales. Also, find out when McDonald’s will begin serving breakfast all day. 

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Author and Basecamp founder Jason Fried joins Chicago Tonight for a conversation about changing the way we work – and why showing up to an office every day doesn't mean we're actually being productive.

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Ann Dwyer

We talk with Crain's Chicago Business Deputy Managing Editor Ann Dwyer about some of the biggest business stories this week, from Crate and Barrel's performance in some key categories to Seattle Sutton's battle in the prepared meals market. Also, find out how coworkers are embracing the spirit of home brewing -- at the office.

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According to a Crain's Chicago Business analysis, Chicago police and fire pensions could drive up property taxes by more than 30 percent. Crain’s senior reporter Thomas A. Corfman joins us to explain the analysis.

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Can Chicago condo buildings ban smoking in owners’ units? Some buildings are making the change. We talk with Crain’s Chicago Business real estate reporter Dennis Rodkin about that, the new disclosure rules coming, and the latest trends in the housing market.

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Trading floor at the Chicago Board of Trade in 1993.

The famed frenzy of open outcry trading that filled the Chicago Board of Trade’s pits for more than 80 years will cease Monday. The closure of most of the futures pits comes as most futures are traded electronically these days. Eddie Arruza visited the CBOT and has the latest.  

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Chase bank will no longer take more than a little loose change from customers -- a move they say is in the name of customer service. But some customers are outraged, including Robert Reed, who wrote a column for Crain's Chicago Business. He joins us to lament the decline of banking services for retail customers.