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“Chicago will not be blackmailed into changing our values, and we are and will remain a welcoming city,” Mayor Rahm Emanuel said Sunday at a press conference announcing the suit.

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(Giuseppe Milo / Flickr)

For black women in Chicago, a breast cancer diagnosis in 2003 meant you were 68 percent more likely to die from the disease than a white woman. A new study shows that gap is closing.

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Should parents be held responsible if they know their kids have guns? We speak to Ald. Raymond Lopez (15th Ward) about a new ordinance.

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Geoffrey Baer solves the mystery of a viewer’s “vague memory” from the 1940s, revisits the Century of Progress and opens the door to the Evanston History Center in this encore edition of “Ask Geoffrey.”

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It is one of the city’s crown jewels, but parts of Lake Shore Drive have not been upgraded since before World War II. A new plan gives parts of the drive a real “wow” factor.

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The public is invited to weigh in on public health policy ideas at a series of upcoming town hall meetings. Get dates, locations and more details.

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(Giuseppe Milo / Flickr)

Researchers of demographic shifts in the Chicago region have some interesting takeaways following analysis of census data. One calls the findings “staggering.”

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Miss Wonderful 1958 contestants (Courtesy of Ernestine Terry)

In the late 1950s, the Chicago Defender and Pabst Brewing Company sponsored the Miss Wonderful 1958, an all African-American beauty contest. Meet Ernestine Terry, who was one of the contestants.

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For more than a decade, a network of nonprofit organizations has been addressing gang violence by hosting summer basketball games in neighborhoods across the city.

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The Chicago Police Department says the city saw 56 shootings and eight homicides from Friday night to Tuesday night, with the majority occurring Monday on the city’s South and West Sides.

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(Steven Kevil / Wikimedia Commons)

Following a highly controversial move in 2013 to close 50 elementary schools, Chicago Public Schools has sought to sell the vacant properties. Find out who is buying the shuttered schools, how much they’re paying, and what the sites could be used for.

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City officials say the ordinance affirms that government agencies will not practice discrimination-based operations, but some activists say the city could do more to protect immigrant and minority rights.

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As Chicago looks to boost recycling rates, Chicago Tonight explores the city's recycling program up close—and with numbers. 

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Chicago’s recycling rate is among the lowest in the country. What the city is now doing to try to change that.

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A worker at Lakeshore Recycling Systems in Forest View. (Alex Ruppenthal / Chicago Tonight)

What happens to Chicago’s recycling after it’s hauled away from neighborhood alleys and sidewalks? We tour a massive processing facility and watch sorting in action.

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Hoda Katebi of CAIR Chicago speaks during a press conference. (Courtesy of Council on American Islamic Relations)

So far this year, the Chicago Council on American Islamic Relations received about 400 complaints of discrimination against Muslim-Americans—the same number it received during all of 2016.