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The Altgeld Gardens Homes on Chicago’s Far South Side provide affordable housing to low-income households. (Zol87 / Wikimedia)

The city of Chicago has a fund paid for by big developers that helps subsidize low-income residents who need help paying rent. But is all of that money going where it's supposed to? 

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TechGirlz is “dedicated to reducing the gender gap in technology occupations,” according to its website. (Courtesy of Tracey Welson-Rossman)

An organization dedicated to teaching technology to middle school-age girls is coming to Chicago this spring.

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(Courtesy of the American Sports Museum)

The American Sports Museum would teach visitors about everything from physics to history. Founder Marc Lapides shares his vision for the space.

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(Matt Masterson / Chicago Tonight)

“If your district is broke, take care of the schools that you have before you open new schools. We think it’s a pretty straightforward idea,” said state Rep. Will Guzzardi, who introduced the legislation.

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(Linda from Chicago / Creative Commons)

“The whole idea is to use our vacant land as a way to adjust the issue of food access by encouraging urban farms and community gardens in certain areas,” said state Rep. Sonya Harper.

Jerry Krause, Dallas Green Ushered in New Eras for Chicago Teams

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Jerry Krause died Tuesday. He was 77 years old. (Courtesy of Chicago Bulls)

There was a time when Chicago sports teams were synonymous with losing. This week, the city lost two men who helped change that perception.

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Courtroom sketch from October 2015 depicts Gary Solomon, right, and Thomas Vranas, left, in federal court. (Thomas Gianni)

The former SUPES Academy chief charged in connection with the Barbara Byrd-Bennett fraud scandal was sentenced Friday to seven years in prison after pleading guilty last year.

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Chicago Teachers Union Vice President Jesse Sharkey (Chicago Tonight)

Chicago Teachers Union delegates are taking this month to discuss the possible May 1 strike with the union’s rank-and-file members before a vote on the action, scheduled for April 5.

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Never Go Without Founder Jesseca Rhymes (Courtesy of Rebecca Healy)

For the third consecutive year, Jesseca Rhymes is asking for feminine hygiene products for her birthday. Not for herself but for women experiencing homelessness.

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Chicago made significant strides as a technology innovation hub in the eyes of industry leaders, according to KPMG’s 2017 Global Technology Innovation Survey. (Ken Lund / Flickr)

Chicago made significant strides as a technology innovation hub in the eyes of industry leaders over the last year, according to a new report. Why the jump?

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(Stephen M. Scott / Flickr)

Ten years ago, Chicago real estate bottomed out – and it still hasn’t fully recovered. But depending on what buyers are looking for, there are promising neighborhoods and suburbs all around.

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(Chicago Tonight)

Chicago Public Schools is seeking to prevent a proposed teacher strike later this spring, claiming the move would be illegal under state law.

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Twenty-seven families gathered together at the John Hancock High School in early March to attend an emergency family planning workshop. (Courtesy of  Antonio Gutierrez)

Increased requests for immigration-related legal services led one Chicago group to launch an immigration hotline, “know your rights” workshops and emergency family planning sessions to address concerns.

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Chicago has expanded the pilot program a Day for Change in an effort to offer increased support to those struggling with homelessness. (Nltram242 / Flickr)

The city is allocating $540,000 toward a program that offers temporary work to hundreds of Chicagoans who are struggling with housing and economic stability.

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(A Council of Educators / Twitter)

Had ASPIRA teachers gone through with their threat to go on strike March 17, it would have been the first labor stoppage for charter teachers in U.S. history.

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Pete Marra appears on Chicago Tonight with host Phil Ponce on Feb. 1.

Last month, ornithologist Pete Marra sat down with Chicago Tonight to discuss his book detailing outdoor cats’ impact on U.S. bird populations. It was an interview that stirred up emotions on all sides.