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The 225,000-square-foot Sears and Roebuck printing facility was once described as its own city within the city of Chicago, but it’s been closed for decades—until now.

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A group of students who participated in the M.U.S.I.C. Inc. program. (Courtesy of Sarah Dupuis)

Can the violin lower student dropout rates? A classically trained musician and a social worker think music lessons have the power to inspire change.

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A dramatic transformation in the Lawndale Triangle, after two years of hard work. “When you sit here, you feel a sense of peace,” said one community organizer.

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Aerial view in 2011 shows parts of North Lawndale and East Garfield Park (Ian Freimuth / Flickr)

How grassroots organizing is increasingly shaping the West Side community, which is looking to develop a shared vision for economic development.

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Several South and Southwest Side communities lag behind national health and wellness benchmarks, according to a new community health survey.

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Anthony Green, left, and his youth development coach Patrick Daniels at the UCAN headquarters in North Lawndale. (Maya Miller / Chicago Tonight)

North Lawndale native Patrick Daniels says his neighborhood is defined by more than violence, and he’s working to change that narrative at UCAN.

WBEZ reporter discusses the year she spent inside a fourth-grade classroom in North Lawndale

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(Andrew Gill / WBEZ)

WBEZ reporter Linda Lutton spent the 2014-15 school year examining the impacts of poverty on a fourth-grade class in North Lawndale for a new story published this week. She spoke with Chicago Tonight to discuss that process.

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The Circuit Court of Cook County is creating a restorative justice community court that aims to empower victims and residents to help rehabilitate nonviolent adult offenders. The pilot program is expected to begin in early 2017 in North Lawndale.

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Neighbors in an area of North Lawndale called the "Lawndale Triangle" feel cut off. They have no park or green space, and very few places where they can come together as a community. Now, neighborhood leaders and a local nonprofit have joined together to create a community park and garden on a lot that's sat empty for years.

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Many black Chicago homeowners were forced to purchase their homes on contract in the ‘60s. Eventually, homeowners in North Lawndale banded together and fought back against buying on contract.  

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We take a look at a little-known piece of Chicago's real estate history: the Contract Buyers League.