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In 1986, Karolina Kowalczyk’s mother was pregnant and living in Poland when the Chernobyl nuclear reactor exploded. Kowalczyk's intricate paper art is now part of an exhibition at the Ukrainian Institute of Modern Art commemorating the 30-year anniversary of the disaster.

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McCormick Place East is being proposed as an alternative location for the Lucas Museum of Narrative Art.  (TonyTheTiger at English Wikipedia)

A new lakefront location for the Lucas Museum of Narrative Art is being proposed in Chicago. Mellody Hobson, wife of movie mogul George Lucas and board member of the Lucas Museum, calls it a “good idea.”

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The snow monkey, born on Wednesday, has since clung tightly to 11-year-old mother Ono. Zoo employees have not yet named it or determined its sex. Maureen Leahy, the zoo’s curator of primates, said they prefer to give mother and infant plenty of space at this stage.

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St. Adalbert Church in Pilsen. (Landmarks Illinois / Flickr)

A Catholic church in the Pilsen neighborhood is among 11 sites on this year's list of most endangered historic places in Illinois.

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In this edition of Ask Geoffrey, our local history expert Geoffrey Baer hits the streets to answer road-related questions such as, Why are there so many angled streets running northwest in Chicago? And, What exactly does Division Street divide? And, Where is Beethoven Place?

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Gingger Shankar (Courtesy of CIMM Fest)

See films and music acts from around the globe at CIMMfest, check out a free screening of the documentary "Peace Officer" and stop by the Greek Independence Day Parade in Greektown. 

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The inaugural two-day festival coming April 21 showcases films that address issues of gender, race, sexuality and other topics related to social injustice and inequality.

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The veteran DJ and Radio Hall of Famer is back on the air following cancer surgery earlier this year. Learn about her new project blending a history lesson with live music.

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(Courtesy of the Art Institute of Chicago)

We take a peek inside the mind – and bedroom – of Vincent Van Gogh in an exhibit at the Art Institute of Chicago that runs through May 10.

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The 2015 documentary “Peace Officer,” from Scott Christopherson and Brad Barber, airs on the PBS series Independent Lens on May 9, with a free screening on Saturday at the Chicago Cultural Center. We speak with Christopherson about the impact his film has had to date.

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(Author photo by Jeffrey Delannoy)

Best known for his 1993 novel "Trainspotting," which chronicled a group of unemployed drug addicts in Scotland, author Irvine Welsh has been called the best storyteller in Britain. But for about 10 years now, he's lived in Chicago. We hear about his latest book, “A Decent Ride.”

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The museum's "chief curiosity correspondent" is one of five online personalities nominated for the 20th annual award, a kind of people's choice of the internet. 

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Animaris Currens Ventosa, Oostvoorne, Netherlands (1993). Courtesy of Theo Jansen. (Adriaan Kok)

Meet the Dutch artist and engineer who makes giant beach animals out of plastic tubing as we revisit his exhibition at the Chicago Cultural Center – a harmonious union of art and engineering, imagination and reality that's open through May 1.

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The second installment of WTTW's "10 That Changed America" premiers Tuesday. This time, host Geoffrey Baer looks at 10 American parks that changed how we live and play in our cities.

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The Cubs have a new clubhouse, and it's one of the biggest and fanciest in all of baseball. Jay Shefsky takes us inside the the state-of-the-art facility.

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A Tony-award winning team will craft a new $4 million “Nutcracker” which dramatically switches gears from Robert Joffrey’s vision, one which has been performed for nearly three decades.