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(Photos courtesy Preservation Chicago)

Preservation Chicago has released its annual list of the most endangered buildings in Chicago, a list they usually call “the Chicago Seven” – but for the first time in 14 years, the organization has included an eighth structure.

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15th annual Polar Plunge (Special Olympics Chicago)

It’s that time of year again, when brazen Chicagoans, some donning outrageous costumes, brave the icy waters of Lake Michigan for a good cause. The 16th annual Polar Plunge benefiting Special Olympics Chicago takes place on Sunday at North Avenue Beach.

Watch what it takes to transport the life-sized Chinese statues

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Warriors don't just unpack themselves. At the Field Museum, it takes almost three hours to unpack just one of the terra-cotta "warriors" – the Chinese statues on display in a new exhibition opening Friday. 

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'2666' at Goodman Theatre

Theater critic Hedy Weiss has high praise for a new spin on "Othello" at Chicago Shakespeare and a "hypnotic" world premiere stage adaptation at Goodman. Get her take on these plays and others on currently on stage in Chicago.

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Toronzo Cannon

Toronzo Cannon is just your typical CTA bus driver who moonlights as a sought-after Chicago blues musician. As a guitarist, singer and songwriter, he drives the sound of Chicago blues from the city to blues clubs and festivals around the world.

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(Author photo by Jeffrey Delannoy)

Best known for his 1993 novel "Trainspotting," which chronicled a group of unemployed drug addicts in Scotland, author Irvine Welsh has been called the best storyteller in Britain. But for about 10 years now, he's lived in Chicago. We'll hear about his new book, “A Decent Ride.”

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Dionne Warwick

Dionne Warwick stops by to reminisce about a WTTW "Soundstage" recording from 1980 – and what it's like to see an actress portray her on stage.

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February 29, better known as leap day, only comes around every four years. The observation of this extra day of our calendar year has some interesting history.

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The doo-wop and soul will be going strong as the theater celebrates its 40th anniversary with some of its hit original shows featuring music from The Spaniels, The Chantels, The Supremes and Otis Redding.

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An estimated 3,000 birds die or get injured from colliding with Chicago buildings each year. A new photography exhibition at the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum aims to bring awareness to the issue.  

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See Yo-Yo Ma perform with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, rub elbows with chickens at the Urban Livestock Expo and keep warm with homemade soup in Lakeview.

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Rendering of the proposed site for the Lucas Museum of Narrative Art (Courtesy Lucas Museum)

Earlier this month, a judge denied the city of Chicago's motion to let Lucas Museum construction begin on its proposed lakefront site. We speak with the head of Friends of the Parks, the nonprofit which filed the lawsuit.

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Not typically known for their brewing prowess, the Field Museum plans to launch a limited-edition beer made with the same ingredients used by the Wari, an empire which flourished in Southern Peru from 600 to 1000 A.D. 

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Geoffrey Baer tackles three questions about Chicago's beloved rapid transit system, including the various spellings of the system, old downtown entrances between elevated stations and Loop stores and a mysterious tunnel a viewer spotted while riding the Blue Line.

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Art and science intersect at an historic – and controversial – look at race. Tour the exhibition "Looking at Ourselves: Rethinking the Sculptures of Malvina Hoffman."

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Marja Mills, the Chicago-based author of "The Mockingbird Next Door" shares stories of her friendship with the late Pulitzer prize-winning author Harper Lee, who died last Friday in her hometown of Monroeville, Alabama.