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Embrace your inner geek at the Chicago Science Festival, meet your favorite authors at BookCon and stroll through Andersonville for the annual Wine Walk.

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Between 1916 and 1970, a little more than 500,000 African-Americans settled in Chicago as part of the Great Migration. Learn about a yearlong, statewide celebration marking this historic event.

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Albany Park Theater Project presents "FEAST"

A critically acclaimed stage production by Albany Park Theater Project makes its television debut on WTTW Thursday night.

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Friends of the Parks has made some powerful enemies in maintaining its opposition to any lakefront site for the Lucas Museum. Is it worth losing the museum in order to maintain the sanctity of the lakefront?

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Karen Alpert

A local author and blogger's hilarious take on parenting in her new book "I Want My Epidural Back."

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Self-Portrait of Vivian Maier (c) Vivian Maier / Maloof Collection

A settlement appears to have been reached over the celebrated photographs of the Chicago-area nanny whose stunning street photography came to light only after her death.

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Geoffrey Baer shares the story of the remarkable man who gave Sox Park's famous intersection one of its names.

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A giant Bridgeport warehouse is home to the city's largest collection of vintage props for movies and TV. Jay Shefsky takes us inside.  

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There’s more tension between the Chicago Cubs and the Lakeview neighborhood. The latest battle centers on whether the plaza just to the west of the stadium should become, as one alderman characterizes it, the world’s largest beer garden.

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Jason Benetti

It’s a dream job, no doubt about it. But Homewood native Jason Benetti works hard to keep his cool while calling games for the team he grew up rooting for.

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Jeanette Pasin Sloan, Crazy II. (Courtesy Jeanette Pasin Sloan)

A Chicago artist makes photo-realistic paintings you have to see to believe. We take a look at the artist’s self-taught beginnings in her suburban kitchen and how her hard work paid off. 

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Sandor Weisz is back with another brain-baffling puzzle. Congratulations to our winner, Steve Orlove. You can still play the puzzle – or you can discover the solution.

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Hear what viewers had to say about the ongoing battle over the Lucas Museum when we read feedback from the "Chicago Tonight" website, and our Facebook and Twitter pages.

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(Courtesy of The Benaki Museum)

At the first modern Olympic Games, a group of Americans' unexpected victory is part of the reason why we still celebrate the games today. A new photography exhibit traces the history of the games and explores its 1896 revival. 

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Left: Aaron Siskind. Gloucester 16 1944, 1944. (The Art Institute of Chicago, The Mary and Leigh Block). Right: Aaron Siskind. Jerome 21 1949, 1949. (The Art Institute of Chicago, Gift of Aaron Siskind)

From New York to Chicago, the influential photographer and teacher focused on “the drama of objects.”

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Reticulated giraffe herd in the Samburu National Reserve in Kenya. (Snakes3yes / Flickr)

In the last two decades the reticulated giraffe population has plummeted and if action isn’t taken to reverse their calamitous decline, they could be eliminated from the wild within a generation. Two Kenyan conservationists join us to discuss the threats these giraffes face and efforts to save them.