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The new, original PBS show “Mercy Street” is a sprawling Civil War drama set in a hotel in Alexandria, Virgina that has been commandeered by the Union Army as a hospital. The six-episode series blends fiction with historical settings in a town where Confederate and Union soldiers mingled with a slaves and free people. We talk with two of the show's producers. 

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A decision this week by a federal judge could green-light plans for the Lucas Museum of Narrative Art, the futuristic-looking proposal from film mogul George Lucas currently facing a lawsuit over its proposed lakefront location.

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A yearlong international arts festival underway in Chicago celebrates the legacy of William Shakespeare and commemorates the 400 years since his death. Barbara Gaines of Chicago Shakespeare Theater and Anthony Freud of Lyric Opera Chicago join us to discuss the festival and the Bard’s legacy.

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There was a time in Chicago when the accordion was everywhere—and not just for polkas. These days, the accordion is not the powerhouse that it used to be, but there is at least one place where the instrument is still going strong. Jay Shefsky went to check it out.

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The Chicago History Museum has turned to Kickstarter to fund a project that would train high school students in East Garfield Park how to record oral history interviews with local residents. Learn more about the Forty Blocks project.

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Self-Portrait of Vivian Maier (c) Vivian Maier / Maloof Collection

Over the course of five decades, Vivian Maier documented city life by taking more than 100,000 photographs, many of them in Chicago. The now-famous street photographer would have celebrated her 90th birthday on Monday. We revisit our story that introduced “Chicago Tonight” viewers to her incredible images.

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Attendance was down 30 percent last year at the museum, largely due to its hugely popular retrospective of David Bowie's career–the museum's most-attended exhibition ever. Most other Chicago museums fared better, according to 2015 attendance data compiled by Museums in the Park.

It's the Weekend Agenda: Jan. 29-31

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Take a dip in Lake Michigan with the Lakeview Polar Bear Club, mellow out to the sounds of trumpeter Marquis Hill, sip wine and winter beer and more.

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(Museum of Contemporary Photography)

In the Loop, a photographic feast is now being served. To celebrate its 40th anniversary, the Museum of Contemporary Photography combed its archives to find the pictures that best reflect the character of the museum. What they found were dramatic images from the 19th century to the 21st.

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The Art Institute's Head Curator of Contemporary Art James Rondeau will officially take over as president of the institution, the museum announced Thursday. The 46-year-old succeeds Douglas Druick, the museum's president since 2011 who announced his retirement in October.

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Geoffrey Baer

Chicago's most famous mayor might have a 50-foot Picasso in a plaza named for him, but a statue of Richard J. Daley resides in Springfield. Geoffrey Baer explains why Hizzoner is honored outside of Chicago in this week's edition of Ask Geoffrey. 

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The largest monetary donation in the history of the Art Institute of Chicago comes courtesy of Dorothy Braude Edinburg, a longtime patron of the museum who died last January at the age of 94.

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AnJi White and Kelvin Roston, Jr. perform in 'Sunset Baby.' (Courtesy of TimeLine Theater)

The Chicago Sun-Times theater critic gives us her take on highly recommended shows from Court Theatre, Griffin Theatre, TimeLine, Shattered Globe, Drury Lane and Paramount Theatre.

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Capturing the delectable dishes served up by Chicago’s finest chefs is an art. Jay Shefsky recently got a behind-the-scenes look at a very tasty photo shoot. We go back for another serving of this mouth-watering piece.

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As many sub-Saharan African countries gained independence throughout the 1960s, they experienced a burst of experimental architecture, marking a severance from once Colonial pasts. A new show chronicling those understudied architectural examples opens Friday via the Graham Foundation.

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Charlotte Moorman (© Julie Abeles)

Being labeled "the topless cellist" was a mixed blessing for one American artist of the avant-garde. Charlotte Moorman's occasional nudity in her performances attracted curiosity, but it also may have distracted from the pioneering work she brought to experimental art of the 1960s and ‘70s. A new exhibition looks at the bold life and legacy of this musician, performer and muse.