Activists warn of ‘dangerous precedent’ if Lake Michigan water diverted

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The city of Waukesha, Wisconsin wants to take just over eight million gallons of water a day from Lake Michigan for the city's drinking water. But environmental activists warn that allowing access could set a dangerous precedent.

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If you’re one of the many Chicagoans living in an apartment or condo with limited outdoor space, growing your own food can seem like a challenge – but, Jeanne Nolan says, anything you can grow in the ground can be grown in a container with just a few adjustments.

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(Courtesy of Foodfacts / Flickr)

The Food and Drug Administration announced its first major change to food nutrition labels since the early 1990s. Will the new information about sugar, calories and serving sizes help people with their diets, or do most people ignore food labels? 

Impact of obesity on health contingent on physical, mental health

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By most medical standards, being healthy means you’re not battling a major disease like cancer, diabetes or cardiovascular disease. But a new study from the University of Chicago questions this traditional method of measuring health.

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Why is Puerto Rico sending addicts from the island to Chicago? WBEZ reporter Odette Yousef explains the story.

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A new report by WBEZ reporter Monica Eng takes a closer look at how the district is testing for lead in the water at 28 schools and whether this method follows best practices.

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Courtroom sketch by Thomas Gianni shows Dennis Hastert standing with the aid of a walker while U.S. District Judge Thomas Durkin asks him questions about molestation.

In court, Dennis Hastert admitted to being a sexual abuser. We hear from some professionals who treat victims of sexual predators about detecting the signs of child sexual abuse.

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She's the co-founder and editor-in-chief of The Huffington Post and a syndicated columnist. Arianna Huffington talks about the wake-up call that led her to write her 15th book, "The Sleep Revolution."

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Lead levels in the water supply are getting nationwide attention after the ongoing crisis in Flint, Michigan came into the spotlight. Now, CPS says it will test for lead in the water at 28 schools, even though it's not legally required to.

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It’s time to start planting! The Organic Gardener Jeanne Nolan returns to WTTW's organic garden to plant cool-season crops selected by viewers and tackle an early flush of weeds. Also, we need your help picking the next round of crops to plant.

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(Steve Johnson / Flickr)

Mayor Rahm Emanuel announced Wednesday initiatives and services to reassure residents that Chicago's water is safe and lead-free.

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The Zika virus has been shown to cause microcephaly and other fetal brain abnormalities. We talk with a local woman, pregnant with her first child, who has been dealing with the terrifying possibility that she and her unborn child may have been exposed to the virus.

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Free summer workout classes, including yoga, return to Millennium Park in June. (Courtesy of the city of Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events)

Fill up your water bottle, grab a yoga mat and head to Millennium Park, where free summer workout classes begin in June. Get the full schedule.

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A new report for consumers based on test results from the U.S. Department of Agriculture sheds light on the prevalence of pesticide residue in produce. Find out which fruits and vegetables had high levels, and which fared better.

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Medical professionals learn how to use the Sexual Assault Evidence Collection kit, which has several packets to collect evidence from a suspect and a patient of a sexual assault case. (Sgt. Rebecca Linder / Wikimedia Commons)

Delays in rape kit testing and strained law enforcement resources nationwide mean that victims of sexual assault may face long waits for their attackers to face prosecution. 

New Report Grades States PE Requirements, Policies

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(U.S. Navy photo by Senior Chief Mass Communication Specialist Gary Ward / Wikimedia Commons)

When it comes to physical education, a new report shows many states aren’t measuring up to national recommendations, including Illinois. Only Oregon and the District of Columbia meet national recommendations for weekly time in physical education at both the elementary and middle school levels, according to the report.