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The Organic Gardener founder, Jeanne Nolan teams up with Chicago Tonight to talk gardening tips and unveil a special project.

Chefs Rally Against Antibiotics in Livestock

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Chicago chefs are rallying against the use of antibiotics in livestock. We debate what this means for city consumers and diners with our panel.

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Community health care providers are partnering to integrate primary health care with mental health care for the city's children and teens. We hear from health care providers about the mental health needs of children in the community and how a new model works.

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At 38 percent, the HPV vaccination rate of teens in Chicago is higher than the national average of 28 percent. But  the vaccination rate is still, too low.

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At 30, Monifa Thomas was a health and medicine reporter at the Chicago Sun-Times. Not long after she passed a complete physical, Monifa had a stroke and was paralyzed on her right side and had great difficulty speaking. We have the story of her recovery, return to her medical beat. 

La Rabida Children’s Hospital Offers Vital Program

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Students with special health needs have had parents do everything for them such as manage doctors’ appointments and answer health insurance questions. But as those students grow up, they must learn to care for themselves. La Rabida Children’s Hospital has a program designed to help both teens and their families make a smooth transition.  

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State legislation allowing psychologists to prescribe medication drugs was approved in a House committee vote last week and now moves on to the full House for further debate. Tonight, we take a look at the controversial bill and debate the pros, cons. Learn more and read the full bill.

Web Do-it-Yourself Eye Exams Coming Soon

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Do-it-yourself online eye exams could transform the world of optometry. We talk to a Crain’s Chicago Business reporter about a local start-up that has just scored $1 million in seed money to make it happen. 

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The first official case of the deadly infection Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) surfaces in the U.S. Last week, a patient was diagnosed at Community Hospital in Munster, Ind. Elizabeth Brackett will have an update and explain more about the dangerous virus. 

Without Funds Center Set to Close

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Come July, Illinois may no longer have a poison control center. Tonight we look at the possibility of the long-standing Illinois Poison Center closing, analyze what that would mean for the state's only poison center. 

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Results show that new treatments for Hepatitis C do work -- but at a cost. Brandis Friedman has the story of the new drugs costing tens- of- thousands of dollars.

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In 2008, Timothy Ray Brown made international headlines as The Berlin Patient when he received a stem cell transplant that eradicated the virus that causes AIDS from his body. We’ll hear from Brown and the head of the AIDS Foundation of Chicago. Read an interview.

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Hollye Jacobs was a nurse, social worker and child development specialist, when she found herself moving into the role of a patient. We look at her journey through surviving breast cancer and her new book, The Silver Lining, a supportive guide to help other cancer survivors. Read book excerpts, view a slideshow, and read an interview with the book's photographer.

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The waiting list of patients seeking an organ transplant has reached almost 125,000 people, but the amount of willing donors is far behind that number. We discuss the past, present and future of organ transplantation. Read the personal story of a nurse-turned-organ donor.

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The Chicago City Council has ordered the Chicago Fire Department to investigate an apparent shortage of ambulances and paramedics. We talk with former Chicago firefighter Ald. Nick Sposato (36th) about the order. Read an interview with Better Government Association investigative reporter Patrick Rehkamp about the implications of fewer ambulances in the city.