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The first seeds and transplants have been planted in the WTTW organic vegetable garden. While these crops continue to grow, we are asking viewers to help us select our summer crops.

Based on recommendations from Jeanne Nolan, The Organic Gardener, we’re asking viewers to decide which types of cucumbers, peppers, tomatoes, and basil we’ll grow. Voting is open through May 18.

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On Friday, May 1, Chicago Tonight staff rolled up their sleeves to plant the first round of crops in the WTTW garden with The Organic Gardener Jeanne Nolan. Crops included plants selected by viewers and a few by The Organic Gardener. 

While we just wrapped up planting our first round of crops, we’re already looking ahead to our summer planting. Once again we’re asking viewers to help us select some of the crops based on Nolan’s recommendations.

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Gardening season is just around the corner. To help us prepare for the upcoming season, The Organic Gardener Jeanne Nolan stops by our garden and studio. 

Last summer, we began our garden with the help of Nolan and her staff. We relied on their expertise to choose which crops to plant. This year we’re asking viewers to help us choose some of the crops we’ll grow.

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Thanksgiving is only two days away, and with the help of The Organic Gardener Jeanne Nolan, we’ll be able to take our remaining crops—Brussels sprouts, beets, rainbow carrots, and the mix of greens growing under our season extension—from the garden to the Thanksgiving dinner table. 

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With winter fast approaching, it’s time to clean up the WTTW garden and remove the remaining summer plants.

The Organic Gardener Jeanne Nolan and Adrienne Detanico stop by to help our garden transition into the next season, as well as plant one more crop. 

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The gardening season has come to an end for most of our summer crops, but that doesn’t mean we’re done gardening until next spring. With the help of The Organic Gardener Jeanne Nolan, we will be able to extend the gardening season and get a jumpstart on next spring.

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While the season had come to an end for many of the sunflowers in our garden, we allowed them to continue to grow in the south garden bed, so we could enjoy them a bit longer.

But that was cut short when a hungry critter decided to have a sunflower snack.

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The season has come to an end for our zucchini and nearly all of our tomato plants.

The Organic Gardener Jeanne Nolan and maintenance crew member Adrienne Detanico help clean up our garden.

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Many of the vegetables in our garden are done or nearly done for the season. But there are a handful of crops that can still be harvested, including tomatoes and kale.

In addition, there are some vegetables we planted in June that have yet to be harvested.

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With the season coming to an end, our organic vegetable garden is looking a little messy.

Take a look at the garden before we roll up our sleeves and do some cleaning up.

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The gardening season is starting to wind down as autumn approaches. Even though most of our tomatoes look browner than green, they are continuing to produce tiny tomatoes.

Take a look at today’s harvest.

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Jeanne Nolan visits Chicago Tonight to give an update on the garden. With powdery mildew and some pests taking their toll, she is back with help and advice for our garden and yours.

Tune in tonight to hear her advice.

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When the sunflowers in our garden first bloomed they stood tall with their flower heads facing forward. Recently, the flower heads have started to droop, causing some of them to fall off.

What’s causing the sunflowers to droop?

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Over the past month, the zucchini plant has deteriorated. Problems began with the onset of powdery mildew, and then a few of the plant’s stems began to wilt.

A few weeks later, most of the stems were wilting, and the once monstrous plant shrank in size. The Organic Gardener Jeanne Nolan and her crew recently inspected the plant.

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On a handful of occasions, I’ve spotted birds in the garden. Naturally, I thought they didn’t belong in the garden, so I shooed them away.

But birds in a garden may not always be a bad thing.

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Approximately two weeks ago, the zucchini plant began developing powdery mildew, which according to The Organic Gardener crew was normal due to the weather conditions.

Despite the disease, the plant continued to produce sizable zucchini, and it continues to even though the plant itself is looking a little beat up.