It's the Weekend Agenda: Nov. 6-8

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The best ways to dance, laugh, eat, drink and stretch your way through the weekend.

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For half a century, “Peanuts” creator Charles M. Schulz entertained and educated the masses with didactic characters that fans came to know as real people—with real causes. From pollution to recycling, the “Peanuts ... Naturally” exhibit at the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum embraces Schulz’ forward-thinking ability to confront global issues through the hearts of children and adults alike.

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Teller, the usually silent half of magic duo Penn and Teller, speaks his mind about the production of "The Tempest" at Chicago Shakespeare Theater, in which he weaves stage illusions into the story of an exiled duke who uses the supernatural world to protect his daughter.

Chicago authors take the focus of the museum's first-ever crowdsourced exhibit

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The distinguished museum opens its mind to the power of suggestion. And it hopes the hip kids will come.

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Laura Eason

The hit Netflix show "House of Cards" has a devoted following, but did you know that one of the people responsible for it is an Evanston native and Northwestern alum? Laura Eason, executive story editor of "House of Cards," takes us behind the scenes of the popular drama.

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In honor of its 150th anniversary, the School of the Art Institute has teamed up with the Art Institute of Chicago for a new exhibition called “Homegrown." The show highlights the many influential American artists who received instruction at the school and later became part of the permanent collection of what has been called “the world’s best museum.”

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A rendering for the American Writers Museum (Courtesy of the American Writers Museum)

Despite being $5 million short on funding, the president of a museum planned to honor American writers seemed confident Tuesday that the museum would reach its goal of a 2017 opening in Chicago.

Admission increases were approved Oct. 15, which means $16 tickets for Chicagoans

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Sue the Tyrannosaurus Rex (John Mountjoy / Flickr)

Chicago residents will have to shell out even more to see Sue the T.rex come January.

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Joshua Bell (Eric Kabik)

Joshua Bell has been a violin virtuoso since he was teenager in Bloomington, Indiana back in the 1980s. He talks with "Chicago Tonight" about his early years, the greatness of the Stradivarius and his favorite collaborators. He'll also treat us to a live performance with pianist Sam Haywood.

130 Ways to Use Your Eyes, Ears, Head

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The 26th annual festival returns with a new-and-now group of talented writers, performers and creative thinkers who head up 130 events throughout the city. We'll help you navigate the options.

World-renowned Zhou Brothers show support, then pull funding for longtime Chicago arts criticism mag

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Artist Annie Markovich - the New Art Examiner's longtime managing editor - stands in the publication's former offices at 230 E. Ohio St.

A longtime Chicago arts criticism magazine is trying to get back on its feet after folding in 2002, but two separate groups are now attempting to publish it–and the world-renowned Zhou Brothers, after an initial show of support, decided to pull their funding. Learn about the rise and fall of the Examiner–and how it echoes the history of Chicago arts funding. 

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“The Queen of Tejan” by Al Rendon and Henry M. DeLeon (Sean Keenehan)

This year’s free exhibit–the largest of its kind in the country–features 116 pieces of artwork from more than 90 artists and offers an inside look at some of the traditions of the holiday.

The professional-personal couple discuss gendered casting, depression and why being an actor is hard, with or without Chris Jones

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Malic White, left, and Molly Brennan (Chloe Riley)

The creative duo talks about “Pop Waits,” the clown rock opera they’re developing that was sparked by a conversation between Iggy Pop and Tom Waits in the 2003 film “Coffee and Cigarettes.”

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Matthew Aucoin (Photo by Todd Rosenberg)

He's a composer, conductor, poet and instrumentalist. And he's already being compared to Mozart. We revisit the 25 year old whose children's opera–written for Chicago–is getting another hearing. 

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Amanda Williams, "Color(ed) Theory"

Geoffrey Baer returns with more dispatches from the Chicago Architecture Biennial, including bold proposals for the future of its host city.