|

After a decades long search, scientists have found a vast reserve of water 400 miles beneath the Earth's surface that could support new theories on how the planet formed.

|

Advancements in robotics technology are changing the fields of medicine, defense, and manufacturing. We talk with Rabiah Mayas about that and more. 

|

What does climate change and national security have to do with each other?  Everything according to science and military experts. We take a closer look on Tuesday’s Scientific Chicago.

|

For the last 50 years, Star Trek has captivated audiences as the crew of the U.S.S. Enterprise explored the galaxy using technological advances – warp drive, wormholes, beaming technology, holodecks – in order to do so. Dirk K. Morr, a professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago, joins us to discuss the scientific ideas behind Star Trek technologies. View a graphic and read an interview.

|

The world’s largest scientific society, American Association for the Advancement of Science, held its annual conference in Chicago this past weekend. Rabiah Mayas, Director of Science and Integrated Strategies at the Museum of Science and Industry, joins us to talk about some of the breaking news in science discussed at the conference.

|

Rocks on Mars, a sleeping spacecraft, and how science can affect this year’s Super Bowl; Rabiah Mayas, Director of Science and Integrated Strategies at the Museum of Science and Industry, joins us with the latest top science news. Read an article.

|

We meet local scientist and entrepreneur Adam Khan to talk about his latest invention that he hopes will usher in a new diamond age of electronics that will make the silicon chip obsolete. Watch web extra videos.

|

Scientists at west suburban Fermilab have installed the final piece on a massive particle detector called NOvA that may answer some very big questions. We go deep underground to uncover how the contraption might do that. Read an article.
 

|

We talk with the man recently hired to turn the city’s high-tech incubator known as 1871 into a major technology hub.

|

The field of nanoscience -- the science of the very small -- is exploding and is likely to profoundly shape our future, impacting everything from energy production and storage to cutting edge, designer medicines. Here to help us separate the science from the science fiction is Dr. Amanda Petford-Long, director of the Nanoscience and Technology Division and the Center for Nanoscale Materials at Argonne National Laboratory.

Lasers, Robotic Fish & Big Bang Afterglow

|

What is a robotic razor fish teaching scientists about building better robots? Why are Argonne scientists going down to the South Pole? And how can a tiny laser boost high-speed data transmission? Our science guy, Neil Shubin, has those stories and more research news in this edition of Scientific Chicago. Read an article.

|

Science catches up with science fiction as we talk to Professor John Rogers, the inventor of epidermal electronics -- tiny, bendy computer chips that can be placed on or in the human body to monitor critical health data. Watch web extra videos.

|

Professor George Crabtree of Argonne National Laboratory discusses the quest to build a better battery and America’s energy future.

|

The movie Gravity, starring George Clooney and Sandra Bullock, has become a runaway box office hit and critical success. And while it’s been hailed for its groundbreaking technical accomplishments, how realistic is it? We hear from some Adler Planetarium astronomers about what they thought of the scientific aspects of the film. Read an Q & A.

|

It’s the world’s most powerful digital camera and it sits atop the Blanco telescope in the Andes Mountains of Chile. But it was constructed on the campus of Fermilab in far west suburban Batavia. The Dark Energy Camera officially began its work on August 31 and has already captured some amazing images of outer space. Its real mission, though, is to help scientists figure out if so-called Dark Energy is responsible for the universe’s accelerating expansion. We learn how the camera is helping scientists unravel one of the greatest mysteries in the cosmos. Watch videos and view a slideshow.