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(NASA)

A team led by Adler Planetarium astronomer Grace Wolf-Chase used a telescope instrument to discover infrared light undetectable to the human eye, revealing new stars in the Milky Way. 

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A hefty Bighead carp, one of several types of Asian carp, caught in a net near Morris, Illinois. (Evan Garcia / Chicago Tonight)

A plan to fortify a barrier against Asian carp was set to be released in February but has been stalled by the Trump administration. 

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Heavy rainfall drenched northern Illinois Wednesday night and Thursday morning. And more is on the way. The Des Plaines and Fox Rivers have seen water levels rise and remain areas of concern.

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(Steve Jurvetson / Wikimedia Commons)

You won’t find driverless cars whizzing through the streets of Chicago today. But behind the scenes, companies are testing and implementing technology for cars to navigate sans human input.

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Dr. J. Allen Hynek was a highly respected scientist for decades before he received a credit as a technical adviser on Steven Spielberg’s 1977 movie. His life and legacy are explored in a new biography.

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The trillion-ton iceberg is now drifting. While experts say it poses no immediate threat, is the event itself the precursor of more change to come as the global environment warms?

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(USDA Forest Service)

Are you ready to party like it’s 1925? That’s the last year Chicago experienced a solar eclipse like it will next month. To celebrate, the Adler Planetarium is hosting a daylong block party, and you’re invited.

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(NASA)

Adler Planetarium astronomer Lucianne Walkowicz will spend the next year figuring out how humans can get along while exploring one of the more curious planets in our solar system: Mars. 

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First went the plastic bags, then the plastic straws. Now they’re coming for more. The Shedd Aquarium announces a new initiative to significantly reduce or eliminate the use of disposable plastic bottles by 2020.

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University of Illinois researchers and physicians at Carle Foundation Hospital developed a rapid test for sepsis that counts white blood cells and certain protein markers that surge when a person’s immune response increases. (Credit: Janet Sinn-Hanlon)

Sepsis affects more than 1 million hospital patients each year in the U.S., but detecting it can take days. Now, scientists at the University of Illinois are developing a rapid test to detect the potentially deadly condition.

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(Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources / Dan Nedrelo)

Life as an amphibian is no easy hop through the woods. Why Chicago scientists are measuring levels of cortisol (the stress hormone) in Lake County frogs.

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BraveCamp participants at work on a project. (Courtesy of Brave Initiatives)

There are plenty of coding classes for teens and young adults in Chicago, and most of them aren’t cheap. But one local nonprofit is shaking up the landscape by offering coding classes to young women—for free.

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A silver carp was captured Thursday in the Illinois Waterway below the T.J. O’Brien Lock and Dam, about 9 miles from Lake Michigan. (Courtesy of Illinois Department of Natural Resources)

An 8-pound Asian carp was discovered last week beyond an electric barrier designed to prevent the invasive fish from reaching Lake Michigan. 

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(Roman Boed / Flickr)

Chicago data scientists competed against teams from Canada and the Netherlands in an annual event that highlights the innovative use of technology to improve the water quality of the Great Lakes. 

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About 5,000 tons of trash from the Chicago area is dumped every day at a landfill in Livingston County, but hardly any of it goes to waste. How yesterday’s trash becomes tomorrow’s energy.

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The Chicago chapter of Women Who Code wants to help shape the culture of the city’s technology industry.

The international nonprofit Women Who Code boasts 100,000 members worldwide. This week, it’s relaunching its Chicago chapter and plans to offer meet-ups and other networking opportunities.