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What part – if any – does global warming play in the intensity of hurricanes? And what infrastructure failures contribute to the utter loss and destruction during extreme weather?

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After heavy storms, the Chicago River’s North Branch floods hundreds of homes on the Northwest Side. The Chicago Department of Transportation is now constructing a permanent flood-fighting weapon. We take a look.

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(Alex Ruppenthal / Chicago Tonight)

Instead of dumping it in landfills, organic waste could be used to power cars, heat homes and potentially reduce the need for new landfills in the U.S., according to research by Argonne National Laboratory.

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(Mark Lopez / Argonne National Laboratory)

New technologies that could change the way we live and work will be on display this month during a reality TV-inspired competition sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy. 

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(Courtesy of The Field Museum)

Chicago’s iconic T. rex Sue will get a makeover when the largest dinosaur ever discovered comes to town. Stretching 122 feet from snout to tail, the titanosaur is longer than two accordion CTA buses end to end.

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(Monika Wnuk / Northwestern  University)

Northwestern University students spent more than a year designing and building a fully solar-powered home that will soon be part of an international competition organized by the U.S. Department of Energy.

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A grand canyon that will become a deep lake: We get a tour of the final reservoir in the Deep Tunnel plan. 

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Vikram Dwarkadas, research associate professor in UChicago's Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics (Jean Lachat / University of Chicago)

A discovery by Chicago scientists could lead to new understanding about the largest explosions in outer space. 

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(Courtesy Lincoln Park Zoo)

About a dozen different species were under close watch during the event as scientists looked for any changes in behavior. 

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The last time a total solar eclipse spanned the continental United States from coast to coast was 99 years ago. Thousands joined in the Adler Planetarium’s celestial celebration to mark the occasion.

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(Alex Ruppenthal / Chicago Tonight)

Animal behavior experts noticed the biggest change in one particular species during Monday’s eclipse: humans. 

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Adler Planetarium astrophysicist Lucianne Walkowicz joins us from the eclipse epicenter in Carbondale. 

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Over the course of civilization, eclipses have been met with fear and superstition. How humans have reacted to—and explained—eclipses throughout history.

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Videos of the eclipse from Chicago’s Adler Planetarium and multiple spots across the U.S. from NASA, plus safety tips, Chicago watch parties and more.

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(Peter Roome / Flickr)

Like scientists across the country, Lincoln Park Zoo’s animal experts will spend Monday’s solar eclipse carefully observing the zoo’s residents for changes in behavior.

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(Courtesy of National Park Service)

What can happen if you look at the sun for too long, even if it’s partially or almost fully blocked? We speak to an ophthalmologist about how to safely watch the eclipse.