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An outbreak of canine distemper has infected a record number of racoons in Cook County, putting dogs at risk of contracting the highly contagious virus.

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The Chicago River is far from America's cleanest waterway. But a few anglers are trying their luck as its ecosystem improves. Captain Tim Frey took us for a winter fishing trip on the river.

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The FBI wants Apple to unlock an iPhone belonging to one of the people behind December's mass shooting in San Bernardino, California. Apple says it's taking a stand for privacy rights, while the FBI says it's merely trying to conduct the most thorough investigation possible.

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A fatal virus affecting honeybees around the world is being made worse by humans – and it's impacting our food supply. Find out what some local beekeepers are doing about it.

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There are signs that climate change is having negative effects on maple syrup production. Researchers are now surveying maple trees in the Midwest to look for them.

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A 10-week-old sea otter pup rescued after a rough storm in California last month is recovering at her new home in Chicago.

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Say so long to the adorable red panda cubs captivating visitors of the Lincoln Park Zoo. Soon, the almost 8-month-old cubs will be leaving town.

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An enormous rooftop greenhouse on Chicago's South Side is growing crops year-round and providing the area with much-needed local produce. Joining us to talk about Gotham Greens' growing power is co-founder and CEO, Viraj Puri. 

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The collision of two black holes—an event detected for the first time ever by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory, or LIGO—is seen in this still from a computer simulation. (Credit: SXS)

The detection of gravitational waves first predicted by Albert Einstein is being hailed as one of the most important discoveries of the modern age. Some local scientists who worked on this groundbreaking achievement are here to explain.

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A coyote in Lincoln Park, near Belmont Harbor. (John Picken)

A viewer's video, shared with "Chicago Tonight," shows his encounter with a coyote in Columbus Park while walking his two dogs. Coyote mating season has begun, which means the urban animals may behave aggressively.

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Scientists at the University of Chicago are hoping a new, highly sensitive camera they're developing for the South Pole Telescope will reveal new information about the early universe. The camera measures something that's nearly 14 billion years old: radiation left over from the Big Bang.

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It’s 2016 and we’re still three metaphorical minutes away from global doom. The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists say global warming and nuclear weapon proliferation pose serious threats to mankind.

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The Chicago River is now visible via Google Street View. A small team spent nearly 10 hours documenting the waterway with a 360-degree camera in October. Here's what it looks like.

Project Nearly 90 Years in the Making

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(Courtesy Field Museum)

The onset of the Great Depression stalled a nearly complete diorama project conceived in the 1920s. Emily Graslie, the Field's chief curiosity correspondent, made it her mission to complete it nearly 90 years later. She joins us to discuss the project.

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For the first time in a decade, five planets will be visible at the same time in the pre-dawn sky – and you won't need a telescope to see them.

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This artistic rendering shows the distant view from Planet Nine back towards the sun. The planet is thought to be gaseous, similar to Uranus and Neptune. Hypothetical lightning lights up the night side. (Caltech/R. Hurt/IPAC)

Evidence of a distant ninth planet in our solar system, electronic implants that can monitor brain injury then melt away, and how more sleep may reduce diabetes risk. Rabiah Mayas of the Museum of Science and Industry is back to review some of the hottest stories in the world of science.