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A new baseball statistic that could help the Chicago Cubs win, a new tool that could revolutionize the surgical removal of cancerous tumors and new images of Pluto and its largest moon, Charon. Museum of Science and Industry director of science and integrated strategies Rabiah Mayas joins us with these stories and more.

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Heavily cited throughout the federal indictment against former CPS CEO Barbara Byrd-Bennett are emails outlining the alleged kickback scheme tied to the controversial $20.5 million no-bid contract awarded to SUPES Academy. Tonight we’ll talk about the misconceptions and myths of email with Jeffrey Cramer, a former federal prosecutor who now heads the Chicago office of security firm Kroll. 

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When we think wildlife, most of us think national parks and far-off forests. But an interactive science project called Chicago Wildlife Watch wants to show us that wildlife is, quite literally, right in our own backyards and outside our high-rise balconies. Seth Magle, director of the Urban Wildlife Institute at the Lincoln Park Zoo, tells us about Chicago Wildlife Watch and how we can all answer the call of the wild. 

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Photo of Chicago by astronaut Scott Kelly

American astronaut Scott Kelly has allowed the human race an opportunity to live vicariously through his #YearInSpace travels by sending global images back to Earth through his Twitter and Instagram feeds. Sent from day 189 of his 12-month mission, Kelly shared this astonishing nighttime view of Chicago from space on Oct. 2.

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An ambitious new government-led research initiative aims to fully map the human brain. The goal is to advance understanding of how the brain works and develop treatments for crippling neurological diseases. But for researchers, the Holy Grail is to understand the origins of human consciousness. Two leading neuroscientists join us to talk about this potentially groundbreaking project.

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There was no public countdown, no fanfare this time. And yet, a corpse flower is blooming – right now – at the Chicago Botanic Garden. Watch a livestream of the rare event.

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After a year of delays, the Array of Things urban data sensor project is back on track and prepping to collect all sorts of information on Chicago's streets by early next year. Joining us to discuss the initiative are the project’s lead scientist Charlie Catlett and author Lori Andrews.

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Conservationist George Archibald and a crane named Tex. (Photo courtesy of the International Crane Foundation)

Conservationist George Archibald has spent his life working to bring cranes back from the brink of extinction. He joins “Chicago Tonight” to talk about his groundbreaking work which has been recognized around the world.

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Did you take pictures of Sunday's harvest supermoon eclipse? We'd like to see them. Use the form below to share your photos with us and we'll use them in an online gallery.

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Last week NASA said it would be making a major announcement today about a discovery on Mars. While some space fans might have been hoping it was about finding life, the announcement was about something almost as significant. Adler Planetarium astronomer Lucianne Walkowicz joins us to discuss the latest on the Red Planet.

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Weather permitting, the Chicago area will be treated to prime time, front-row seats for a rare astronomical phenomenon Sunday evening when a total lunar eclipse of a simultaneous harvest moon, supermoon and blood moon rises above the horizon.

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Mrs. Helen Moyer holding a large model of an eel in 1947. (Photo courtesy the Field Museum)

Archival photos from the Field Museum depict researchers and the taxidermy they worked on – and loved posing with.

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Seth Magle, Ph.D., Director of the Urban Wildlife Institute, secures a camera trap that is used to capture data for Chicago Wildlife Watch. (Courtesy of Urban Wildlife Institute/Lincoln Park Zoo)

A group of local science researchers want your help on a truly wild project. Learn about Chicago Wildlife Watch, and how you can help them better understand the urban ecosystem of Chicago.

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Emily Graslie

Emily Graslie may just have the coolest job in the world. She's the Chief Curiosity Correspondent for the Field Museum and the driving force behind the popular YouTube channel The Brain Scoop. Graslie joins Chicago Tonight to discuss her work popularizing science.

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Spike, a corpse plant, on Aug. 3, left, Aug. 26, center, and Sept. 1 at the Chicago Botanic Garden.

We conduct a postmortem on Spike, the smelly corpse flower that failed to bloom at the Chicago Botanic Garden. What happened? Paris Schutz has the story.

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As the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District cuts the ribbon on it's new sewage reservoir, we revisit Jay Shefsky's visit in May to the bottom of the Thornton Quarry.