Stories by Michael Lipkin

"The Astronaut Wives Club"

While NASA astronauts were lauded as American heroes, it was up to their wives to present the facade of a perfect family life. In her new book, The Astronaut Wives Club, author Lily Koppel tells the story of the dozens of women who tried to maintain normalcy as the nation scrutinized their every move. We revisit a conversation with Koppel. Read an article and an excerpt.

"The Internet Police"

How Crime Went Online and the Cops Followed

We take a look at the new criminals of the internet age -- and the technology police use to catch them. Read an excerpt from The Internet Police: How Crime Went Online and the Cops Followed.

#civicsummer

Summer Program Teaches Students Technology Skills

We look at the Smart Chicago Collaborative's summer program for students, teaching some basic computer skills--and what is means to be a programmer. Read an article.

Kwame Raoul Mulls IL Governor Race

WIll State Sen. Kwame Raoul challenge Gov. Pat Quinn in the Democratic primary? Columnists Eric Zorn, of the Chicago Tribune, and Laura Washington, of the Chicago Sun-Times, share their takes on the impact a Raoul candidacy would have on the race.

More Than 500 Dead in Egyptian Crackdown

Nearly 4,000 people were injured and more than 500 killed Wednesday as Egyptian authorities attempted to disperse protest camps loyal to ousted president Mohamed Morsi. M. Cherif Bassiouni, a war crimes expert and law professor at DePaul University, joins us on Chicago Tonight at 7:00 pm with insight into the conflict.

Bake and Destroy

"Good Food for Bad Vegans"

Bake and Destroy blogger Natalie Slater joins us with tips to make vegan food with a punk twist. Read an interview and recipe.

"All the Babe's Men"

In the longest doping suspension in baseball history, Alex Rodriguez is potentially benched for 211 games. Twelve other players also get hefty bans related to a performance-enhancing drug scandal. We look at the impact on the game. Read an article.

Early Signs of Alzheimer's

Could patients complaining of early signs of dementia be right -- even if tests say they're perfectly normal? We have some of the latest Alzheimer's research, including "subjective cognitive decline," when people sense that their memory is failing, even when no one else can notice a difference. Read an article.

Bruce Rauner

Venture capitalist Bruce Rauner, co-founder of private equity firm GTCR, won the GOP nomination. 

Egyptian Authorities Kill 72 Protesters

In the second mass killing of protesters in three weeks, Egyptian authorities attacked protesters in Cairo Saturday, killing 72. M. Cherif Bassiouni, a war crimes expert and law professor at DePaul University, joins us with insight into the conflict.

Bill Daley

The first potential Democratic challenger to Gov. Pat Quinn was Bill Daley, who officially announced his candidacy on July 30, only to drop out of the race on Sept. 16.

What Makes a Leader Great?

Are leaders born or bred? Loyola University business ethics professor Al Gini joins us to discuss his book, 10 Virtues of Outstanding Leaders. Read an excerpt. 

"Chicago Skyscrapers"

We take a look at Chicago's famous skyscrapers-- and the political deals that shaped them. Author Thomas Leslie joins us with more from Chicago Skyscrapers: 1871-1934. Read an interview.

"From the Ground Up"

Jeanne Nolan left Winnetka as a teenager in 1987, frustrated with what she saw as an unhealthy materialism in everyday life. She joined a commune in California to learn organic farming, but eventually realized the commune, with cult-like leaders, was a dangerous place to be. Moving back in with her family 17 years later, without traditional job training, she turned her parents' backyard into an organic garden. She joins us. Read an interview with Nolan.

Hot Doug's

Hot dog lovers come from around the world to eat at Hot Doug's. "Hot Doug" himself, owner Doug Sohn, gives us a behind-the-scenes look at how he got started. Read a Q&A.

"Chicago's Greatest Year, 1893"

Think of Chicago in 1893, and the World's Columbian Exposition comes to mind--with millions of visitors flooding the Midway to visit the White City. But 1893 was a seminal year for Chicago for at least a dozen other reasons, including something as seemingly insignificant as the debut of a new brand of chewing gum. Author Joseph Gustaitis joins us with stories from the year that changed Chicago forever. Read an article.

Implementing Concealed Carry

With Illinois now the final state to allow concealed carry, law enforcement officials are putting in place the infrastructure to make it happen. Cook County Sheriff Tom Dart is here with details on how gun owners will apply for permits.

IL General Assembly Overturns Quinn's Veto on Concealed Carry

Concealed carry is legal in Illinois, as the legislature deals another blow to Gov. Pat Quinn. Chicago Sun-Times Springfield Bureau Chief Dave McKinney has the details. View interactive graphics to see how Senate and House members voted.

IL Senate Overrides Gov. Quinn's Concealed Carry Veto

In the year's second special session, the Illinois Senate votes to override Gov. Pat Quinn's concealed carry veto, 41-17. See how your senator voted in our interactive graphic.

IL House Overrides Quinn's Concealed Carry Veto

The Illinois House voted against Gov. Pat Quinn's amendatory veto of concealed carry legislation, 77-31. See how House members voted in our interactive graphic.

Alice Walker

"The Color Purple" author on poetry

Her most famous work may be the novel The Color Purple, but Alice Walker says she is a poet at heart. Walker won the Pulitzer Prize for The Color Purple in 1983, the first African-American woman to do so. Now the poet-turned-novelist has two new books, of poetry and prose. She joins us. Read an article.

"The Lost World of Fossil Lake"

Snapshots From Deep Time

Fifty-two million years ago, after the extinction of dinosaurs, a tropical lake basin surrounded by volcanoes was home to thousands of diverse species. Now that basin is known as Wyoming's Fossil Lake, with some of the most well-preserved fossils in the world. The Field Museum's Lance Grande brings us some of his fantastic finds from The Lost World of Fossil Lake. Read an interview with Grande and view photos.

"The Astronaut Wives Club"

While NASA astronauts were lauded as American heroes, it was up to their wives to present the facade of a perfect family life. In her new book, The Astronaut Wives Club, author Lily Koppel tells the story of the dozens of women who tried to maintain normalcy as the nation scrutinized their every move. Read an article and an excerpt.

White Sox, Bulls Partner with Becoming a Man

Players and executives from the White Sox and Bulls are part of a new series of PSAs to promote Becoming a Man, the school-based anti-violence program. Bulls forward Jimmy Butler, White Sox executive vice president Ken Williams, and University of Chicago Crime Lab co-director Harold Pollack join us with more on their collaboration. Watch the video and read an article.

"The Road to War"

Presidential Commitments Honored and Betrayed

The last time an American president asked Congress for a declaration of war was in 1941, after the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor. Longtime CBS and NBC News correspondent Marvin Kalb says this new normal undercuts Congress' constitutional authority and undermines America's reputation worldwide. Read a Q&A with Kalb.