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They appear to be marbled, speckled, dipped and dyed, with names like “Red Glitter” and “Jingle Bell Rock.” We visit a poinsettia farm and learn what it takes to cultivate the crop in time for the holidays.

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(Courtesy of Imperfect)

Fruits and vegetables come in all shapes and sizes, but only those that meet strict cosmetic requirements end up in grocery stores, while “ugly” produce goes to waste. Imperfect, a new produce delivery service, hopes to change that.

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(Linda N. / Flickr)

Chicago could become the first U.S. city outside of California to adopt a policy requiring it to purchase food from sources that meet a set of health, environmental and fair labor standards.

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 (Zol87 / Creative Commons)

Research shows that hundreds of thousands of Chicagoans live in food deserts. According to a 2006 report, most of those in Chicago were made up entirely of African-American residents. 

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(Linda from Chicago / Creative Commons)

“The whole idea is to use our vacant land as a way to adjust the issue of food access by encouraging urban farms and community gardens in certain areas,” said state Rep. Sonya Harper.

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(Kevin Dooley / Flickr)

Advocates for Illinois’ agriculture industry anticipate new export opportunities if the U.S. relaxes trade barriers with Cuba. 

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(kat_geb / Flickr)

At least 16 states have legalized industrial hemp production for commercial purposes. Could Illinois be next?

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You’re probably aware that Chicago has high schools specializing in math and science as well as the arts, but did you know that Chicago’s big urban school system has an agricultural high school?

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A new bacterial disease infecting corn crops has been confirmed in Illinois, but researchers know very little about the disease or what impact it could have on the agricultural industry.

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Nic Helderman of Mighty Vine.

Tomatoes and salad greens that are served in upscale Chicago restaurants are grown in Ogle County, Illinois. We visit the source.

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Some farm groups are criticizing a new report about the hazards of atrazine, a herbicide that was banned by the European Union more than 10 years ago.

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In the heart of Chicago, shaded by the afternoon shadow of Michigan Avenue skyscrapers, watered by the mist of Buckingham Fountain wafting through the air, is a farm. The surprising site is one of many small, sustainable, organic farms that have been created and are run by Growing Power, an organization that teaches farming and entrepreneurial skills to kids in Cabrini Green, Altgeld Gardens, Roosevelt Square and other places around the city. We take a look inside. Read an interview with Monte Henige, CEO of Tru Fragrance, a fragrance development company that uses ingredients from Growing Power Chicago in their products.