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(U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)

With nearly $300 million in federal funding on the chopping block, leaders from across the Great Lakes region will convene next month in Chicago to address lead poisoning, oil pipelines and other threats to the area’s waters.

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(Evan Garcia / Chicago Tonight)

Looking at the impact of a proposed funding cut to the program that aims to keep invasive species out of the Great Lakes.

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A hefty Bighead carp, one of several types of Asian carp, caught in a net near Morris, Illinois. (Evan Garcia / Chicago Tonight)

Wildlife agencies and fishermen in Illinois are using a Chinese technique to catch Asian carp, an invasive fish species threatening the Great Lakes ecosystem.

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A bighead carp (U.S. Geological Survey / Flickr). Inset: An Asian carp burger at Asian Carp Grill 2015. (Margaret Frisbie)

Adventurous eaters concerned about Asian carp entering the Great Lakes will have a chance to devour the invasive fish at a special event held along the Chicago River next week.

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Despite a spate of recent reports, the Illinois Department of Natural Resources says that reintroducing alligator gar into Illinois' waterways will not prevent Asian carp from reaching Lake Michigan.

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This bighead carp was caught in the Illinois River, the principal tributary of the Mississippi River. There are no North American fish large enough to eat Asian carp, according to the Asian Carp Regional Coordinating Committee. (USGS)

A process similar to making soda water may be an effective strategy in warding off an Asian carp invasion that’s threatening the health of the Great Lakes, including Lake Michigan.

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The Army Corps of Engineers moves ahead on its plan to control Asian carp and other invasive species.

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A major federal report was released Monday giving options for dealing with Asian carp, ranging from maintaining status quo to installing a permanent barrier to separate the Great Lakes from the Mississippi River Basin. Elizabeth Brackett has the story. Read the full report.

Dreaded Invaders Found in Chicago Lagoons

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The Shedd Aquarium unveils three giant new Bighead Asian Carp. But just where were they caught, and what does it tell us about the battle to keep these invaders away from the Great Lakes? 

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We show you how striking a balance between economics and the environment could help prevent an Asian carp invasion.

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Courtesy Kate Gardiner

A new report proposes a multi-billion dollar engineering change to Chicago's waterways to cut off an Asian Carp invasion. Ash-har Quraishi has the details.