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(Tanya Martinez / Puerto Rico Department of Natural and Environmental Resources)

Experts in Chicago are working to save one of the world’s most endangered birds. 

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In the early 1960s, bald eagles were nearly extinct in the lower 48 states. But government protections and conservation measures have had a huge impact on their numbers. “I think it’s an incredible success story,” said biologist Chris Anchor.

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After 20 years in the fashion industry, Owen Deutsch wasn’t planning on getting back into photography. But then he discovered a new subject: birds.

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Pete Marra appears on Chicago Tonight with host Phil Ponce on Feb. 1.

Last month, ornithologist Pete Marra sat down with Chicago Tonight to discuss his book detailing outdoor cats’ impact on U.S. bird populations. It was an interview that stirred up emotions on all sides. 

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(Shedd Aquarium)

For the fifth year, members of Shedd Aquarium's Animal Response Team participated in a rescue mission of endangered penguin chicks in South Africa. Learn about their work.

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(Courtesy of the Field Museum)

A Smithsonian ornithologist says outdoor cats are devastating bird populations.

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A long-eared owl (Courtesy of Rob Curtis)

Why are there so many long-eared owls showing up in Chicago this winter? Bird watchers call it an “irruption.”

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Each year tens of thousands of volunteers participate in more than 2,000 Christmas Bird Counts throughout the Western Hemisphere. (Camilla Cerea / Audubon)

There are many Christmas traditions, but one that is especially beloved by people who love birds is the annual Christmas Bird Count. Learn more.

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A Guam kingfisher at Lincoln Park Zoo. This type of bird now only exists in captivity. (Heather Paul / Flickr)

In the mid-1980s, the Lincoln Park Zoo and Brookfield Zoo set up critical captive breeding populations of two bird species native to the Pacific Islands. A new report from the Center for Biological Diversity underscores the impact of such programs.

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Since 2003, a group called the Chicago Bird Collision Monitors has made it their mission to collect birds that have been killed or injured after striking buildings and other structures.

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The long voyage of many migratory birds sometimes ends in Chicago. What one photographer is doing to raise awareness of window kill and light disorientation.

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An estimated 3,000 birds die or get injured from colliding with Chicago buildings each year. A new photography exhibition at the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum aims to bring awareness to the issue.  

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On a handful of occasions, I’ve spotted birds in the garden. Naturally, I thought they didn’t belong in the garden, so I shooed them away.

But birds in a garden may not always be a bad thing.

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One could say that the Chicago Field Museum is putting a lot of eggs in one basket, with the publication of its new book, The Book of Eggs. The result being a grand collection, extensive showcase of 600 species of birds. We find out more when John Bates, associate curator and book editor, joins us. Take a quiz.

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Brutal winter conditions this year devastated the bird population in the Midwest region. The Field Museum has collected roughly 60 specimens but many more have perished as a result of starvation from limited open water on Lake Michigan. We speak with Field Museum research assistant and ornithologist Josh Engel about the phenomenon. Read an article and view a slideshow.

Ruffling Some Feathers

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This edition of Chicago Tonight's Field Trip is for the birds. We discover parasites that live on winged creatures and how studying them can help humans. Watch the web extra video and view a slideshow.