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A new mural at the Chicago Cultural Center honors 20 women, past and present, who contributed to the cultural life of the city. “Chicago Tonight” was on site throughout the creation of the work, the largest to date by Chicago artist Kerry James Marshall.

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“Black Enough” by Max Sansing (Courtesy of Gallery 19 / SOFA Chicago)

Basketball kept Max Sansing and his friends out of trouble, but when the rims were removed from neighborhood parks and schools, their lives were changed. Now Sansing is using old backboards to tell that story.

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(Kalyee Costello)

“I’d like more people to be interested in science,” said Chicago student photographer Kaylee Costello. “These images will hopefully grab their attention, so they also know there is art within science.”

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His artwork is in the collections of George Lucas, Jay-Z and Mayor Rahm Emanuel. We get a preview of the show “Hebru Brantley: Forced Field” at the Elmhurst Art Museum.

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Contemporary artwork is in the spotlight. We get a behind-the-scenes preview of Expo Chicago, the citywide art show at Navy Pier and other city destinations.

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There’s a new floating attraction along Chicago’s Riverwalk. We go for a look.

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(Chicago Voz / Luiz Magaña)

When a developer painted over a beloved and iconic mural on a shuttered Pilsen community center last month, the response was swift and strong.

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Artwork by Lilly Wachowski, best known as co-director of “The Matrix,” honors 27 transgender people killed last year—and allows the viewer to look them in the eyes.

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(Courtesy MK Czerwiec)

MK Czerwiec began writing comics as a way to cope with the challenges of being an AIDS nurse during the height of the epidemic. Now, she’s hoping to use comics as a way to begin conversations around caregiving. 

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When asked to describe the late artist Ed Paschke, Vesna Stelcer, the director at the Jefferson Park art center that bears his name, chooses one word: timeless.

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Chef Rick Bayless' photo for The Uplifted project. (Kentaro Yamada)

Two years ago, Park Ridge resident Kentaro Yamada began work on a series of human interest portraits – with a twist: each would include a prized possession levitating before the subject’s eyes.

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A gargoyle flies above the southeast corner of Wabash Avenue and Randolph Street. (Credit: Jeff Lassahn)

The recently installed “Flying Creatures Initiative” on the southeast corner of Wabash Avenue and Randolph Street is part of the city’s Year of Public Art.

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Craig Rex Perry grew up in Englewood and has studied and worked around the world. We catch up with him in Kenwood during a master class on cartooning – and careers.

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Evan Haase, “Old Glory,” 2015. (Courtesy of the Jackson Junge Gallery)

Curators of a new show at the Jackson Junge Gallery wanted to highlight political issues without taking sides. “I didn’t want it to be a political, Trump-bashing show,” said Chris Jackson, the gallery’s owner and director. 

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From left: Works by Charles Dawson, Lee Godie, and Dorothy and Otis Shepard.(Courtesy of the Terra Foundation for American Art)

A new art initiative in Chicago will include dozens of exhibitions and hundreds of public programs in 2018.

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(Ervin A. Johnson)

“I hope that when black people look at it they see how powerful and beautiful we are despite everything that’s happened to us,” said artist Ervin A. Johnson.