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We salute the sparkling stage presence of a turn-of-the-century star with a cocktail made with Prosecco, limoncello and summer fruit.

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Before Sabella Nitti was sentenced to hang in 1923 for the murder of her husband, no other woman in Chicago had received such a fate. But Nitti’s case was different in more ways than one.

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What happened to the Alexander Hamilton statue in Lincoln Park? Geoffrey Baer tells his story.

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Unless you run in nerdy history circles, chances are you’ve never heard of Cora Strayer, private detective. Belly up to the bar for a history lesson—with a spirited twist.

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Was the design of White Castle restaurants based on a Chicago landmark? Geoffrey Baer has the answers you crave.

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Men line up to enlist in World War I. (Courtesy of Christopher Reed)

The museum is turning to the public for help in telling the story of African-Americans who served as combat soldiers during World War 1.

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Geoffrey Baer drops the curtain on an opera house mystery in this week’s edition of Ask Geoffrey.

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The Gray-Cloud house in 2017. (Courtesy of David Cloud)

A farmhouse built in 1856 may have ties to the Underground Railroad. This summer, the homeowners and a Lake Forest archaeologist will begin work to uncover the mystery.

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In the early days of their existence, Chicago’s street gangs developed some unique conventions that, ironically, helped law enforcement track them down. We took a look at the history of Chicago’s gang sweaters.

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Geoffrey Baer explores an eccentric architect’s wacky proposal for the World’s Fair.

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The 7-foot-tall stone man has been shouldering a heavy burden on the corner of a building in Chicago’s industrial Southeast Side since around 1915. More than hundred years without a break! But there’s some debate as to exactly who he is.

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Chicago’s Burnham Harbor (David Ohmer / Flickr)

Robert Nelson’s at-times tumultuous tenure as Chicago’s “harbor boss” is chronicled in his new book “Dirty Waters: Confessions of Chicago’s Last Harbor Boss.”

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In a new graphic novel from the Chicago Architecture Foundation, teens – past, present and future – traipse through Chicago neighborhoods to ponder some big questions, such as: What makes a community?

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(Credit from left: SecretName101 / Wikimedia Commons; Geoff Livingston / Flickr)

Many believe there is a fault line that divides Chicago, pitting brother against brother in a long-standing crosstown rivalry. But a viewer wonders if that historic boundary is a myth.

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The 50th on the Lake motel was operating on Lake Shore Drive by 1958. After several transformations, it’s known today as the Lake Shore Hotel. (Courtesy of Jacob Kaplan)

For nearly a decade, the website Forgotten Chicago has documented the city’s storied past. Meet the site’s co-founder and editor, Jacob Kaplan.

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(Ken Lund / Flickr)

Should Chicago annex the suburbs to save its shrinking population? Why one author thinks that might be a good idea.