|

Though best known for his multimedia contemporary art, Chinese dissident Ai Weiwei is also a prolific photographer. We visit an exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Photography showcasing his work.

|
A Museum Hack tour in progress at the Art Institute of Chicago. (Courtesy of Museum Hack)

Museum Hack’s offbeat tours of the Art Institute of Chicago aim to engage the next generation of museum-goers. “Your job is fun first, education along the way,” says one tour guide.

|

A new chapter in Chicago’s cultural offerings begins this week.

|

They can play blackjack, dance and climb walls. The Museum of Science and Industry brings back its interactive exhibition – with a few new additions.

|

Contemporary art with Mexican roots: Celebrating 30 years at Chicago’s National Museum of Mexican Art.

|
March for Science Chicago organizers said 60,000 people attended the April 22 event. (Susan Wigodner / Twitter)

According to organizers, an estimated 60,000 people attended the March for Science Chicago, making it the largest of those that took place Saturday in 400-plus cities worldwide. But some area institutions did not officially support the event.

|
The exhibition “Once Upon a Castle” avoids imposing gender stereotypes and norms onto children. (Courtesy of Chicago Children's Museum)

By eschewing traditional tiaras, thrones and knightly armor, a fairy tale-minded exhibition at the Chicago Children’s Museum hopes to spark children’s imaginations without imposing gender stereotypes.   

|
(Peter McCullough / MCA Chicago)

Area teens can add one more freebie to their summer to-do lists.

|
(Courtesy Paul Natkin)

From handwritten lyrics to vintage instruments to iconic outfits, a new look at 50 years of the Rolling Stones.

|
From left: Works by Charles Dawson, Lee Godie, and Dorothy and Otis Shepard.(Courtesy of the Terra Foundation for American Art)

A new art initiative in Chicago will include dozens of exhibitions and hundreds of public programs in 2018.

|
James McNeill Whistler. “Arrangement in Grey and Black No. 1 (Portrait of the Artist's Mother),” 1871. Musée d'Orsay, Paris, RF 699. © RMN-Grand Palais / Art Resource, NY.

We visit the Art Institute of Chicago to find out more about the 19th century oil painting “Arrangement in Grey and Black, Number One” – commonly known as “Whistler’s Mother.” 

|
(Courtesy of the Field Museum)

More than 30 million objects are stored behind the scenes at the Field Museum. A new exhibition addresses how scientists from all over the world are using the vast collections to make new discoveries.

|
(Courtesy of the American Sports Museum)

The American Sports Museum would teach visitors about everything from physics to history. Founder Marc Lapides shares his vision for the space.

|
A meltwater river formed by glacier melt in Greenland. (James Balog / Museum of Science and Industry)

The changing face of glaciers around the world is the topic of a new exhibition at the Museum of Science and Industry.

|
“Armor for Man and Horse,” about 1520 with modern costume. South German, Nuremberg. The Art Institute of Chicago, George F. Harding Collection.

The Art Institute of Chicago unveils new galleries of medieval and Renaissance art – including the re-installation of the popular arms and armor collection. We get a sneak peek.

|
Images like this one from Helen Balfour Morrison comprise the exhibition “Photographing Freetowns.”

A new exhibition at the Newberry Library features a rarely seen collection of work by a Chicago-area photographer who documented the history of small communities founded by former slaves after the Civil War.