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The Altgeld Gardens Homes on Chicago’s Far South Side provide affordable housing to low-income households. (Zol87 / Wikimedia)

The city of Chicago has a fund paid for by big developers that helps subsidize low-income residents who need help paying rent. But is all of that money going where it's supposed to? 

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Several South and Southwest Side communities lag behind national health and wellness benchmarks, according to a new community health survey.

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While the end of Meyers Ace Hardware is certainly a loss to its South Side community, it’s also leaving a piece of Chicago’s jazz history hanging in the balance.

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We explore two neighborhoods that are at the epicenter of the gentrification battle, and how elected officials, community groups and developers are waging it.

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(Stephen M. Scott / Flickr)

Ten years ago, Chicago real estate bottomed out – and it still hasn’t fully recovered. But depending on what buyers are looking for, there are promising neighborhoods and suburbs all around.

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(Jeremy Atherton / Flickr)

Nearly 2,000 renters in Chicago gave the city poor marks for weather, quality of schools and safety, but landed more favorably on public transit and job opportunities, according to a survey conducted by Apartment List.

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Raven Smith is the youngest leadership award recipient in decades. (Courtesy of Reina Smith)

The 18-year-old founder of a Chicago clothing line will be the youngest recipient of a leadership award at the Chicago Neighborhood Development Awards on Tuesday. Meet Raven Smith and learn about her brand, Straight From The Go.

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The 50x50 Neighborhood Arts Project aims to bring more public art to all of Chicago's neighborhoods, including murals like this one in Bronzeville. (Courtesy of the City of Chicago)

New murals, sculpture and other works of public art are coming to each of Chicago’s 50 wards as part of the city’s Year of Public Art initiative.

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Chicago’s 606 trail is only a little over a year old and already there is an ambitious proposal to extend it. 

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Chicago street signs have it pretty tough. They get battered by the elements, vandalized, stolen – and worst of all, they get no gratitude for helping people navigate our city. Let’s tip our hats to Chicago’s poor unheralded street signs with two questions about these everyday heroes.

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(David Gremp)

In 1978, photographer David Gremp spent a year documenting 14 Chicago libraries, their neighborhoods and their patrons. Gremp snapped hundreds of images, giving his subjects a simple directive: look straight into the camera.

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A group of girls walk in Englewood. This building is across the street from one of 50 Chicago Public Schools that closed in 2013. (Photo by Bill Healy)

A new book by Natalie Moore about the South Side blends personal history with investigative reporting to tell the story of a segregated city and misunderstood neighborhoods.

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Chicago is seeing a rise in high-rise construction with 34 new buildings over 200 feet tall currently under construction. That number has doubled in the last 15 months. What’s causing the sky-high building boom? Curbed Chicago editor AJ LaTrace joins "Chicago Tonight" to explain.

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Geoffrey Baer visits an artist under glass, gets that sinking feeling at a Jackson Park garden, and reveals the hej hej history of the Andersonville neighborhood's name in this encore edition of Ask Geoffrey.

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A little-known waterway built in the 1830s allowed Chicago to grow not once, but twice! Hear the story of the crucial canal that you may never have heard of, and the story behind one of the South Side's best known public works of art in tonight's edition of Ask Geoffrey.

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Fuller Park

The problem in one of Chicago's most economically depressed communities isn't just crime. We explore what's being done to improve one of the city's small neighborhoods.