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(Ameren Illinois / Facebook)

Residents in central and southern Illinois will pay nearly 30 percent more on utility bills than projected if Ameren is allowed to lower its energy savings target, environmental and consumer advocates said Wednesday.

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(Daniel X. O'Neil / Flickr)

Efficiency plans filed by Ameren Illinois fail to comply with the state’s new energy law and could prevent the creation of additional jobs, according to a new report. 

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The so-called Future Energy Jobs Bill would bail out two struggling nuclear plants. Critics say it would amount to the largest rate hike in U.S. history.

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(Daniel X. O'Neil / Flickr)

Will there be a radical change in how consumers pay electricity bills in Illinois? 

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A new bill in Springfield could see Illinois consumers paying higher electricity rates. But with the state already producing more energy than it needs, why are consumers being asked to pay more?

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Hundreds of thousands of city residents have chosen to get their electricity through the municipal aggregation program. But now many of those might want to opt out because of higher rates. Paris Schutz has more.

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Utility giant ComEd's first female president talks about the company's future plans to keep customers out of the dark.

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ComEd could lose more customers if hundreds of Illinois municipalities change the way residents get electricity. We take a closer look at the Election Day referendums, and what it could mean for you.

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Mayor Rahm Emanuel touts ComEd's $2.6 billion investment in the new smart grid as good for the economy and good for consumers. Consumer watchdog group CUB promises to stay on top of the smart grid to make sure it is smart for ComEd clients. Elizabeth Brackett reports.