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Red-headed woodpeckers collected near the Des Plaines River in Cook County, Ill., in 1901 (top) and in Braidwood, Ill., in 1982 (bottom). (Courtesy of Carl Fuldner and Shane DuBay)

Researchers analyzed 1,000 birds collected over the last 135 years by the Field Museum and other institutions to track the amount of soot in the air of Rust Belt cities. 

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(Courtesy of The Field Museum)

Chicago’s iconic T. rex Sue will get a makeover when the largest dinosaur ever discovered comes to town. Stretching 122 feet from snout to tail, the titanosaur is longer than two accordion CTA buses end to end.

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(Courtesy of Peggy Macnamara)

‘The Peregrine Returns’ is not just a story of recovery, but adaptability, exploring how the cliff-dwelling bird has made a home in an urban environment.

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Get a behind-the-scenes look at the Field Museum, and the role and influence of the curators who put the museum's incredible collection together.

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(Courtesy of The Field Museum)

A new exhibit aims to be an immersive experience that brings the 2015 movie and its gigantic reptilian stars to life. 

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Emily Graslie appears on Chicago Tonight in September 2015.

The rally, march and expo is projected to be among the largest of those taking place Saturday in 400-plus cities worldwide.

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Life model of the new species Teleocrater rhadinus, a close relative of dinosaurs, preying upona juvenile cynodont, a distant relative of mammals. (Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales)

A Field Museum researcher is among a global group of scientists who have discovered an early dinosaur that reshapes our understanding of dinosaurs’ evolution. 

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(Courtesy of the Field Museum)

More than 30 million objects are stored behind the scenes at the Field Museum. A new exhibition addresses how scientists from all over the world are using the vast collections to make new discoveries.

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Japanese irezumi by Horiyoshi (© Martin Hladik / Courtesy of The Field Museum)

The Field Museum has a new look at tattooing – an age-old tradition that is as popular now as it was millennia ago.

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The Field Museum’s Matt von Konrat says that more than 3 million plant specimens have yet to be digitally cataloged. "We still have a ton of undiscovered diversity locked away," he said. (Courtesy of the Field Museum)

It's home to an estimated 30 million objects from across the globe, but only about 25 percent of the Field Museum's collection has been cataloged in a digital database. Starting Thursday, volunteers can help grow that percentage.

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A sign spotted at the Field Museum’s new “Tattoo” exhibition. (Chicago Tonight)

In conjunction with “Tattoo,” the museum's latest exhibition on the history of the tattoo which opens Friday, it has opened a pop-up shop. Learn more.

Discovery Results in Creation of 2 New Genera

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The jawbone of a newly reclassified beardog fossil (Field Museum specimen no. PM423), left, is shown in comparison with the jawbone of a larger beardog (specimen No. P12029) that lived approximately 22 million years later. (© Susumu Tomiya / The Field Museum)

Thanks to an inquisitive Field Museum researcher, a nearly 40-million-year-old fossil housed at the institution has been identified as one of the earliest relatives of dogs, bears and foxes known as a beardog. 

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Emily Graslie appears on “Chicago Tonight” in September 2015.

The Field Museum's Chief Curiosity Correspondent has a new show and she's here to tell us all about it.

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The Chicago chanterelle is smaller than other chanterelle mushrooms and is practically odorless compared to the distinctive fruity smell emitted by other types. (Field Museum)

A restaurant-worthy mushroom was identified by researchers from the Field Museum and Chicago Botanic Garden. Meet the Chicago chanterelle.

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Field Museum research associate Noé de la Sancha shows a mammal skull to visitors at the museum’s Identification Day in 2015. (Courtesy of the Field Museum)

Field Museum scientists are ready to identify your strangest natural possessions this weekend. Learn more about Identification Day.

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Field Museum archaeologists made an unexpected find while excavating an the site of an ancient city in southern Mexico.