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(Courtesy of Sonia Bell)

As FEMA and other groups have slowly brought aid to Puerto Rico, some family members living abroad have embarked on private rescue missions. Meet one Chicagoan who recently returned from a trip to visit her parents.

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Mayor Rahm Emanuel said Monday the city is not only offering emergency responders to help Puerto Rico, but has already accepted 1,600 evacuees. 

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The Trump administration fights back against widespread criticism of its slow response to Hurricane Maria, while Chicago’s Puerto Rican community mobilizes to try to send supplies and water to the island.

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(Tanya Martinez / Puerto Rico Department of Natural and Environmental Resources)

Experts in Chicago are working to save one of the world’s most endangered birds. 

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Jose López, left, and Oscar López Rivera (Courtesy of Jose López)

Some say he was railroaded. Others call him a terrorist. Meet the brother of a former Chicagoan whose sentence was commuted this week by President Barack Obama.

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Why is Puerto Rico sending addicts from the island to Chicago? WBEZ reporter Odette Yousef explains the story.

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A story by WBEZ and This American Life in April revealed that heroin abusers from Puerto Rico were being sent to unlicensed drug rehab programs in Chicago, many of which appear to be little better than flophouses and use methods that are questionable at best. The facilities often force clients to give them their identity papers for safe keeping, and don't always give them back when the clients leave. A follow-up report from WBEZ has found that some of the Puerto Rican addicts sent to Chicago appear to be victims of identity theft.

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With a fast-approaching debt payment due to the International Monetary Fund and no deal in sight, the world waits to see whether cash-strapped Greece will remain a part of the Euro currency. And here at home, massive pension debts and political battles are complicating budget deals for the state of Illinois and city of Chicago. We talk with two economists about both local and global economic issues.

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A major campaign is gaining steam in the effort to award the so-called Borinqueneers the Congressional Gold Medal. During the Korean war, the 65th Infantry Regiment made up of soldiers from Puerto Rico displayed valiant and often heroic service all the while facing the challenges of discrimination and prejudice. We speak with one of the last surviving Borinqueneers living in Chicago and a member of the Borinqueneers Congressional Gold Medal Alliance, which is pushing for the commendation to happen this year. View a timeline about the 65th Infantry Regiment.