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From left: Marie Curie, Christina Ciecierski and Julie Des Jardins (Courtesy Northeastern Illinois University)

Honoring the 150th anniversary of the birth of physicist Marie Curie and its own 150th anniversary, Northeastern Illinois University this month hosts a conference celebrating women’s contributions to science. Find out what’s on tap.

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(Chicago Tonight)

This fall, Roosevelt will begin offering a new scholarship to future STEM teachers, thanks to a $1.4 million grant from the National Science Foundation.

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BraveCamp participants at work on a project. (Courtesy of Brave Initiatives)

There are plenty of coding classes for teens and young adults in Chicago, and most of them aren’t cheap. But one local nonprofit is shaking up the landscape by offering coding classes to young women—for free.

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The Chicago chapter of Women Who Code wants to help shape the culture of the city’s technology industry.

The international nonprofit Women Who Code boasts 100,000 members worldwide. This week, it’s relaunching its Chicago chapter and plans to offer meet-ups and other networking opportunities.

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Students participate in the U.S. CyberPatriots competition, sponsored by the U.S. Air Force and Air Force Association. (U.S. Air Force)

Can a collectible card game teach cybersecurity skills to middle school students? A UIC professor wants to get young people excited about computer science and interested in high-demand, high-paying careers.

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(Courtesy of University of Oxford)

Citizen scientists can help researchers discover new distant galaxies as part of the Adler-led Zooniverse project. 

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With the end of the school year just weeks away, the Museum of Science and Industry is calling on Chicago’s “kid superheroes” to unite and defeat summer’s top villain: the “evil Dr. Brain Drain.”

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(YouTube / Virgin Galactic)

Northbrook native Beth Moses, chief astronaut instructor for the world's first commercial spaceline, returns to Chicago to receive Adler Planetarium's Women in Space Science Award. 

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Eugenia Cheng

If you’re not a fan of math, Eugenia Cheng is on a mission to change your point of view. 

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TechGirlz is “dedicated to reducing the gender gap in technology occupations,” according to its website. (Courtesy of Tracey Welson-Rossman)

An organization dedicated to teaching technology to middle school-age girls is coming to Chicago this spring.

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(Matt Masterson / Chicago Tonight)

About 1,300 high school students completed Project Lead The Way’s college- and career-readiness credentialing program last year. More than 60 of those came from Stevenson High School – the highest total for any individual high school in the country.

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(J.B. Spector / Museum of Science and Industry)

To get children and teens interested in science, technology and engineering careers, Chicago’s Museum of Science and Industry is planning a new program examining the world around us and the role of humans in it. 

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(Nicholas James / Wikimedia Commons)

A new two-year grant program will seek out new community-based methods of getting minorities and women involved in science, technology, engineering and math careers.

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With girls and women seriously underrepresented in fields involving computer science, we visit a computer camp that is aiming to change that at the Illinois Institute of Technology. 

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The annual Icebox Derby encourages teen girls to pursue careers in STEM through a unique, hands-on experience. (Courtesy of ComEd)

Dozens of teenage girls from the Chicago area are getting a unique, hands-on STEM experience as they transform recycled refrigerators into solar-powered race cars in the ComED Icebox Derby.

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At five CPS neighborhood high schools, students are earning college credit through a number of dual-credit courses. Those schools are also providing those students with a focused education on the science, technology, engineering, and math fields, or STEM for short. We take a look at how these schools work, how partnering with corporations like Microsoft and IBM helps, and why learning STEM benefits students who don't want to pursue science as a profession.