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(YouTube / Virgin Galactic)

Northbrook native Beth Moses, chief astronaut instructor for the world's first commercial spaceline, returns to Chicago to receive Adler Planetarium's Women in Space Science Award. 

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Eugenia Cheng

If you’re not a fan of math, Eugenia Cheng is on a mission to change your point of view. 

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TechGirlz is “dedicated to reducing the gender gap in technology occupations,” according to its website. (Courtesy of Tracey Welson-Rossman)

An organization dedicated to teaching technology to middle school-age girls is coming to Chicago this spring.

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(Matt Masterson / Chicago Tonight)

About 1,300 high school students completed Project Lead The Way’s college- and career-readiness credentialing program last year. More than 60 of those came from Stevenson High School – the highest total for any individual high school in the country.

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(J.B. Spector / Museum of Science and Industry)

To get children and teens interested in science, technology and engineering careers, Chicago’s Museum of Science and Industry is planning a new program examining the world around us and the role of humans in it. 

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(Nicholas James / Wikimedia Commons)

A new two-year grant program will seek out new community-based methods of getting minorities and women involved in science, technology, engineering and math careers.

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With girls and women seriously underrepresented in fields involving computer science, we visit a computer camp that is aiming to change that at the Illinois Institute of Technology. 

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The annual Icebox Derby encourages teen girls to pursue careers in STEM through a unique, hands-on experience. (Courtesy of ComEd)

Dozens of teenage girls from the Chicago area are getting a unique, hands-on STEM experience as they transform recycled refrigerators into solar-powered race cars in the ComED Icebox Derby.

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At five CPS neighborhood high schools, students are earning college credit through a number of dual-credit courses. Those schools are also providing those students with a focused education on the science, technology, engineering, and math fields, or STEM for short. We take a look at how these schools work, how partnering with corporations like Microsoft and IBM helps, and why learning STEM benefits students who don't want to pursue science as a profession.