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BraveCamp participants at work on a project. (Courtesy of Brave Initiatives)

There are plenty of coding classes for teens and young adults in Chicago, and most of them aren’t cheap. But one local nonprofit is shaking up the landscape by offering coding classes to young women—for free.

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The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms is lending the city access to technology that police hope will help close thousands of gun cases opened every year.

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The Chicago chapter of Women Who Code wants to help shape the culture of the city’s technology industry.

The international nonprofit Women Who Code boasts 100,000 members worldwide. This week, it’s relaunching its Chicago chapter and plans to offer meet-ups and other networking opportunities.

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(Courtesy of Brookfield Zoo)

Customized activity monitoring devices are helping Brookfield Zoo staff study sleeping patterns and other behaviors in giraffes. 

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TechGirlz is “dedicated to reducing the gender gap in technology occupations,” according to its website. (Courtesy of Tracey Welson-Rossman)

An organization dedicated to teaching technology to middle school-age girls is coming to Chicago this spring.

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The new book “Screenwise: Helping Kids Thrive (and Survive) in Their Digital World” by Devorah Heitner.

Technology is creating challenges for today's parents. A local author has advice for how parents can plug into the changing world of social media, apps and the online world.

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Technological advances are changing not just our work, but our workplace as well. While creating whole new industries and products on the one hand, it also ushers in the decline of other, traditional industries. A panel of experts gives us a glimpse of what the workplace of the future may look like.

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We talk with Digital Learning Coordinator Jennie Magiera about how technology is enhancing the school experience for CPS students. Read an interview.

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Science catches up with science fiction as we revisit a conversation with Professor John Rogers, the inventor of epidermal electronics -- tiny, bendy computer chips that can be placed on or in the human body to monitor critical health data. Watch web extra videos.

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From building a website to building the computer itself, students from the Woodlawn neighborhood are getting hands-on technological experience under a new program called Artifice. The programs founders, who are affiliates of the University of Chicago, say they hope the program will provide the students with skills that will eventually turn into careers or small businesses. Read an article.

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Science catches up with science fiction as we talk to Professor John Rogers, the inventor of epidermal electronics -- tiny, bendy computer chips that can be placed on or in the human body to monitor critical health data. Watch web extra videos.

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How do tech incubators work, and what’s the real story behind this growing scene in Chicago? Our panel of experts – from both universities and private incubators -- weigh in. View a map of tech incubator locations in Chicago.

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Protesters take to social media for the NATO summit. We take a look at some of the latest tools and analysis.