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Actor Dion Johnstone portrays Ira Aldridge in Chicago Shakespeare Theater’s production of “Red Velvet.” (Photo by Liz Lauren)

Exploring the connection between a controversial painting at the Art Institute and the new play “Red Velvet” at Chicago Shakespeare Theater.

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The Christmas season is the only time to see a rare Nativity scene that blends both spiritual and earthly pursuits. We go for a look.

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Paul Gauguin. Portrait of the Artist with the Yellow Christ, 1890–91. Musée d’Orsay, Paris, acquired by the national museums with the participation of Philippe Meyer and a Japanese sponsorship coordinated by the newspaper Nikkei, 1994.

A new exhibit at the Art Institute showcases the little-known woodworking and ceramics of artist Paul Gauguin.

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James McNeill Whistler. “Arrangement in Grey and Black No. 1 (Portrait of the Artist's Mother),” 1871. Musée d'Orsay, Paris, RF 699. © RMN-Grand Palais / Art Resource, NY.

We visit the Art Institute of Chicago to find out more about the 19th century oil painting “Arrangement in Grey and Black, Number One” – commonly known as “Whistler’s Mother.” 

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“Armor for Man and Horse,” about 1520 with modern costume. South German, Nuremberg. The Art Institute of Chicago, George F. Harding Collection.

The Art Institute of Chicago unveils new galleries of medieval and Renaissance art – including the re-installation of the popular arms and armor collection. We get a sneak peek.

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(Courtesy of the Art Institute of Chicago)

Beginning Monday, city residents under the age of 18 will no longer be required to pay the $14 admission fee at the museum in Grant Park thanks to a gift from a pair of Kansas donors.

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László Moholy-Nagy. A 19, 1927. Hattula Moholy-Nagy, Ann Arbor, Michigan. © 2016 Hattula Moholy-Nagy/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Bold paintings from the 1920s, plus photographs and industrial design: A new show looks at an international artist who made a big impression in Chicago.

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A look into the world of art glass paperweights as we preview an upcoming auction from a very famous collection.

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Grant Wood, “American Gothic,” 1930. (Friends of American Art Collection. The Art Institute of Chicago)

It has been said that the Great Depression was the best thing that ever happened to American artists. A new exhibition looks at how artists of the 1930s applied their diverse visions to the American dream during this time of immense change.

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Mouth painter Antonio Davis at the 2015 Art in Motion fundraiser. (Jeffrey Ross Photography)

The 14th annual Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago fundraiser features artwork by 23 of their patients, including art by two mouth painters who will show off their skills during Thursday's opening reception. 

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Self-portraits by the late outsider artist, taken in photo booths which used to accompany Chicago's bus stations, are at the center of a new exhibition opening Friday at the Intuit Art Center in Noble Square.

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Ann Goldstein

Ann Goldstein, the former director of Amsterdam's Stedelijk Museum, will take over the position previously held by James Rondeau, who is now the museum's president.

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"White Crucifixion," Mark Chagall. 1938. (Sharon Mollerus / Flickr)

The famous painting had been on loan to Florence's Palazzo Strozzi since September. In November, the painting moved briefly to the Vatican for a visit with Pope Francis, who had declared it to be one of his favorites. 

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No need to chop off your ear – the Art Institute is adding extra dates to its Vincent Van Gogh-themed Airbnb listing, a rented room constructed in the style of Van Gogh's 1889 painting "The Bedroom."

The museum also created a real-life replica of Van Gogh's bedroom on Airbnb

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Starting Sunday, the Art Institute of Chicago will exhibit all three of Van Gogh's "bedroom paintings," the famous series the Dutch artist painted of his own bedroom while living in the provincial town of Arles, France.

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The Art Institute's Head Curator of Contemporary Art James Rondeau will officially take over as president of the institution, the museum announced Thursday. The 46-year-old succeeds Douglas Druick, the museum's president since 2011 who announced his retirement in October.