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A gene found in an Amish family in Indiana may hold the secret to living longer and healthier. We speak with the lead author of a new study.

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Babies born within 2 miles of a fracking site are more likely to suffer negative health effects, according to a new study co-authored by a professor at the University of Chicago. 

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People with early stage Parkinson’s disease could benefit from high-intensity exercise, according to a first-of-its-kind study which found that it decreased the worsening of motor symptoms when performed three times a week.

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Fibromyalgia affects up to 6 percent of the world’s population, yet little is known about the cause of the disorder, characterized by widespread pain and fatigue. University of Illinois at Chicago researchers now hope to uncover its origins.

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In an effort to reduce the number of back-to-back pregnancies among adolescents, Chicago researchers are designing a multimedia tool kit to educate, engage and offer resources to young women.

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(Mike Mitchell / National Cancer Institute)

Northwestern University scientists believe they may have found the “Achilles’ heel” of cancer. In a recent study, researchers were able to almost completely eradicate the disease in laboratory cell cultures.

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The Earth Microbiome Project aims to catalog all of the world’s microbial communities. (G.M. King)

Scientists say there are more bacteria in the ocean than stars in the universe, yet little is known about them. A new study outlines the “crazy idea” that led to a project described by one scientist as the “Google database for microbes.”

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(Linda Bartlett / Wikimedia Commons)

In some Chicago neighborhoods, pharmacies appear to be in abundant supply. In others, they’re scarce. Researchers will spend the next three years addressing their dwindling numbers on the city’s South and West Sides.

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A new tool developed by University of Chicago scientists could boost public health officials’ ability to predict how severe an upcoming flu season will be. 

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 A memorial in Las Vegas for victims of the Oct. 1 shooting that left 58 dead and more than 500 wounded. (Jay Smith / Chicago Tonight)

While public awareness of mass killings is undoubtedly higher, U of I researchers say the frequency with which they occur is steady – and it’s remained that way over the last decade.

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“Our research may be tapping into one of nature’s original kill switches, and we hope the impact will affect many cancers,” said Northwestern scientist Marcus Peter. “Our findings could be disruptive.”

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Red-headed woodpeckers collected near the Des Plaines River in Cook County, Ill., in 1901 (top) and in Braidwood, Ill., in 1982 (bottom). (Courtesy of Carl Fuldner and Shane DuBay)

Researchers analyzed 1,000 birds collected over the last 135 years by the Field Museum and other institutions to track the amount of soot in the air of Rust Belt cities. 

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Is there a connection between losing the ability to smell and a greater risk of dementia? A co-author of a new University of Chicago study says it “may be an important early sign.” 

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Low-income pregnant women are more likely than their wealthy counterparts to experience chronic placental inflammation, which is linked to preterm birth and low birth weight, a new study finds. 

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EVATAR is a female reproductive tract that fits in the palm of one’s hand. Each divided compartment within the cube contains a 3-D model of a different part of the reproductive tract, such as the ovaries, fallopian tubes, uterus, cervix, vagina and liver. The blue fluid pumps through each compartment and performs the function of blood. (Courtesy of Northwestern Medicine)

A miniature female reproductive system will help researchers better understand the cause of polycystic ovary syndrome, and advance the development of drugs to treat the disease.

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(Basil Greber / University of Chicago)

A new study suggests that Earth’s tectonic plates began moving 3.5 billion years ago – about half a billion years earlier than previously thought.

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