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Once a year, scientists and veterinarians check on nesting birds at Baker’s Lake in Cook County, where they can also learn a lot about the environment – and predict possible health concerns for humans.

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(Illustration by Phillip M. Krzeminski)

A research team with a Chicago connection has uncovered new evidence about the devastating impact of the dinosaur-killing asteroid that struck Earth about 66 million years ago.

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A Magellanic penguin chick hatched May 12 at Shedd Aquarium. (Courtesy Shedd Aquarium)

A new Magellanic penguin chick hatched Saturday at Shedd Aquarium, just hours before Mother's Day. 

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(Tanya Martinez / Puerto Rico Department of Natural and Environmental Resources)

One of the world’s most endangered birds finds itself in even greater peril after a hurricane ripped through its habitat last year. But you can help – by drinking beer. 

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(Brenna Hernandez / ©Shedd Aquarium)

New residents of the aquarium’s “At Home on the Great Lakes” exhibit are spending their first days bonding with their mother. 

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An African penguin chick hatched Feb. 10 at Lincoln Park Zoo, pictured here at 21 days old. (Courtesy Lincoln Park Zoo)

On Feb. 10, Lincoln Park Zoo welcomed a new baby bird, the first African penguin chick hatched and reared at the zoo's new penguin habitat. 

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A warbling vireo photographed at Montrose Point Bird Sanctuary by Rob Curtis.

Here’s something that might surprise you: The best place in the entire state of Illinois to see birds during their spring migration is in the city of Chicago. 

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(Courtesy Forest Preserves of Cook County)

Despite the early April snow showers, a recent bird sighting in Cook County is a strong sign that warmer spring weather is just around the corner.

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(Jim Schulz / Chicago Zoological Society)

The yet-to-be-named chick is healthy and being hand-reared by animal care staff, the zoo said this week.

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A whooping crane family (Klaus Nigge / U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Headquarters / Flickr)

Bird experts from around the world are flocking to a Chicago Audubon Society event in Chicago this weekend. We speak with conservationist George Archibald, who delivers the keynote speech at event.

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(Courtesy of Noah Strycker)

Meet the man who literally went to the ends of the Earth to see as many bird species as possible.

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An illustration of Caihong juji, a newly discovered species of dinosaur from 161 million years ago that featured rainbow-colored feathers. (Illustration by Velizar Simeonovski / The Field Museum)

The colorful display of feathers common among hummingbirds has roots in a bird-like Chinese dinosaur from 161 million years ago, a new study finds.

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Noah Strycker birding in California in 2014. (Bkpix / Wikimedia Commons)

In 2015, Noah Strycker became a birding legend after a yearlong journey across seven continents to see more than half the world’s 10,000-plus bird species. He speaks this month in Chicago about the adventure and his new book “Birding Without Borders.”

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Noodle, an 18-year-old Hyacinth macaw, sits on the shoulder of Celeste Troon, director of living collections at the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum. (Alex Ruppenthal / Chicago Tonight)

A trio of tropical birds has landed in Chicago this winter to show off their vibrantly colored feathers and occasional dance moves – but they won’t be here for long.

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(Jerry Goldner)

An owl loving Chicago photographer takes us along as he shoots a majestic snowy owl during the last “invasion” in 2014.

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(Brenna Hernandez / © Shedd Aquarium)

Meet Drake, Magdalena, Pebbles and Wellington. They are the first penguins to turn 30 at Shedd Aquarium, and among the oldest penguins in human care across the U.S.