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An African penguin chick hatched Feb. 10 at Lincoln Park Zoo, pictured here at 21 days old. (Courtesy Lincoln Park Zoo)

On Feb. 10, Lincoln Park Zoo welcomed a new baby bird, the first African penguin chick hatched and reared at the zoo's new penguin habitat. 

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A warbling vireo photographed at Montrose Point Bird Sanctuary by Rob Curtis.

Here’s something that might surprise you: The best place in the entire state of Illinois to see birds during their spring migration is in the city of Chicago. 

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(Courtesy Forest Preserves of Cook County)

Despite the early April snow showers, a recent bird sighting in Cook County is a strong sign that warmer spring weather is just around the corner.

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(Jim Schulz / Chicago Zoological Society)

The yet-to-be-named chick is healthy and being hand-reared by animal care staff, the zoo said this week.

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A whooping crane family (Klaus Nigge / U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Headquarters / Flickr)

Bird experts from around the world are flocking to a Chicago Audubon Society event in Chicago this weekend. We speak with conservationist George Archibald, who delivers the keynote speech at event.

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(Courtesy of Noah Strycker)

Meet the man who literally went to the ends of the Earth to see as many bird species as possible.

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An illustration of Caihong juji, a newly discovered species of dinosaur from 161 million years ago that featured rainbow-colored feathers. (Illustration by Velizar Simeonovski / The Field Museum)

The colorful display of feathers common among hummingbirds has roots in a bird-like Chinese dinosaur from 161 million years ago, a new study finds.

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Noah Strycker birding in California in 2014. (Bkpix / Wikimedia Commons)

In 2015, Noah Strycker became a birding legend after a yearlong journey across seven continents to see more than half the world’s 10,000-plus bird species. He speaks this month in Chicago about the adventure and his new book “Birding Without Borders.”

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Noodle, an 18-year-old Hyacinth macaw, sits on the shoulder of Celeste Troon, director of living collections at the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum. (Alex Ruppenthal / Chicago Tonight)

A trio of tropical birds has landed in Chicago this winter to show off their vibrantly colored feathers and occasional dance moves – but they won’t be here for long.

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(Jerry Goldner)

An owl loving Chicago photographer takes us along as he shoots a majestic snowy owl during the last “invasion” in 2014.

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(Brenna Hernandez / © Shedd Aquarium)

Meet Drake, Magdalena, Pebbles and Wellington. They are the first penguins to turn 30 at Shedd Aquarium, and among the oldest penguins in human care across the U.S.

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Bird enthusiasts are enjoying an “invasion” of snowy owls in Chicago and across northeastern Illinois this winter. Check out our map of recent snowy owl sightings.  

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For 70 years, hunters have been shooting waterfowl at Wolf Lake on the city’s Far South Side. It is the only state park within city limits, and one of the only places to hunt in Chicago. We go for a visit.

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It’s open season for hunters of Canada geese, but the migrating birds have found a novel way to stay out of the firing line: wintering in the city. Rabiah Mayas joins us with that story and more from the world of science.

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Black-crowned night herons average about 2 feet in length and weigh nearly 2 pounds. (Courtesy Lincoln Park Zoo)

The black-crowned night heron is one of the rarest birds in Illinois. Lincoln Park Zoo now hosts a colony of more than 600 herons, but things have getting a bit crowded. 

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Red-headed woodpeckers collected near the Des Plaines River in Cook County, Ill., in 1901 (top) and in Braidwood, Ill., in 1982 (bottom). (Courtesy of Carl Fuldner and Shane DuBay)

Researchers analyzed 1,000 birds collected over the last 135 years by the Field Museum and other institutions to track the amount of soot in the air of Rust Belt cities. 

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