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(Courtesy The Field Museum)

The Field Museum’s famous dinosaur will be moved to the second floor as part of a planned makeover, and to make room for the eventual installation of a touchable cast of the largest dinosaur ever discovered. 

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An illustration of Caihong juji, a newly discovered species of dinosaur from 161 million years ago that featured rainbow-colored feathers. (Illustration by Velizar Simeonovski / The Field Museum)

The colorful display of feathers common among hummingbirds has roots in a bird-like Chinese dinosaur from 161 million years ago, a new study finds.

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(Courtesy of The Field Museum)

Chicago’s iconic T. rex Sue will get a makeover when the largest dinosaur ever discovered comes to town. Stretching 122 feet from snout to tail, the titanosaur is longer than two accordion CTA buses end to end.

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(Courtesy of The Field Museum)

A new exhibit aims to be an immersive experience that brings the 2015 movie and its gigantic reptilian stars to life. 

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Life model of the new species Teleocrater rhadinus, a close relative of dinosaurs, preying upona juvenile cynodont, a distant relative of mammals. (Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales)

A Field Museum researcher is among a global group of scientists who have discovered an early dinosaur that reshapes our understanding of dinosaurs’ evolution. 

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Lisa Randall

Dark matter: we can't see it, but it's believed to make up 85 percent of all matter in the universe and without it we almost certainly wouldn't be here. Particle physicist and New York Times bestselling author Lisa Randall joins us to discuss her new book "Dark Matter and the Dinosaurs: The Astounding Interconnectedness of the Universe."

Paleontologists Discover Largest Predatory Dinosaur

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Image from the October edition of National Geographic magazine.

The scientists behind the discovery of Spinosaurus, the largest predatory dinosaur ever found, visit Chicago Tonight.

Dinosaurs, Deception, Touch & Nanoparticles

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Can lying be perfected? Researchers at Northwestern University delve into the art of deceit. Our science guy, Neil Shubin, joins us to explain these stories and more in tonight's Scientific Chicago.

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It's a bird! It's a porcupine! It's a tiny fanged dinosaur? The Chicago paleontologist who discovered the new species joins us to talk about the odd dinosaur.