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Chicago police Officer Jason Van Dyke attends a hearing for the shooting death of Laquan McDonald at the Leighton Criminal Court Building, Friday, May 4, 2018.  The media was later ordered to leave the courtroom. (Antonio Perez / Chicago Tribune / Pool)

Chicago police officer Jason Van Dyke will stand trial Sept. 5 in the shooting death of teenager Laquan McDonald.

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Witness Bryan Edelman, a trial consultant hired by the defense to conduct change-of-venue polls, answers questions at a hearing in the Jason Van Dyke case at Leighton Criminal Court in Chicago on April 18, 2018. (Nancy Stone / Chicago Tribune / Pool)

Three-quarters of Cook County residents familiar with the high-profile case believe suspended police Officer Jason Van Dyke is guilty, according to a survey conducted on behalf of the defense.

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Jason Van Dyke, left, sits with his attorney Daniel Herbert at his hearing at Leighton Criminal Court in Chicago Wednesday April 18, 2018.    (Nancy Stone / Chicago Tribune / Pool)

Attorneys for Chicago police Officer Jason Van Dyke say prejudicial and inflammatory comments made by public officials have amounted to a "public execution" of their client.

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Jason Van Dyke, left, with his attorney Daniel Herbert inside the Leighton Criminal Court Building in Chicago on Thursday, March 8, 2018. (Nancy Stone / Chicago Tribune / Pool)

Illinois’ highest court has struck down a Cook County judge’s order requiring all filings in the murder case of suspended Chicago police Officer Jason Van Dyke to be made in his chambers under seal.

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Chicago police Officer Jason Van Dyke attends a hearing for the shooting death of Laquan McDonald at the Leighton Criminal Court Building, Friday, May 4, 2018.  The media was later ordered to leave the courtroom. (Antonio Perez / Chicago Tribune / Pool)

In a 10-page written order, Cook County Judge Vincent Gaughan noted that as many as nine witnesses called to testify Friday “could be exposed to harm” if their names were to be made public.

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Jason Van Dyke, left, sits with his attorney Daniel Herbert at his hearing at Leighton Criminal Court in Chicago Wednesday April 18, 2018.    (Nancy Stone / Chicago Tribune / Pool)

The judge in the high-profile murder case could unseal documents not yet seen by the public later this month. A defense expert witness also testified Wednesday about a possible change of venue in the case.

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Chicago police Officer Jason Van Dyke, foreground, stands in front of Judge Vincent Gaughan at the Leighton Criminal Court Building in Chicago on Wednesday, March 28, 2018. (Nancy Stone / Chicago Tribune / Pool)

It’s been more than two years since Jason Van Dyke pleaded not guilty to murder charges in the death of Laquan McDonald. The judge in the case now says he wants the trial to get moving in the coming months.

Protesters call for trial start date more than two years after case first began

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Jason Van Dyke, left, with his attorney Daniel Herbert inside the Leighton Criminal Court Building in Chicago on Thursday, March 8, 2018. (Nancy Stone / Chicago Tribune / Pool)

In 2015, Chicago Police Officer Jason Van Dyke pleaded not guilty in the fatal shooting of Laquan McDonald. But a start date for the trial is likely still months away.

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Jamie Kalven appears in court Dec. 6. (Courtesy of WGN)

Jamie Kalven, the Chicago journalist who broke the story of Laquan McDonald’s shooting death, will not be compelled to turn over his sources or testify in open court, a judge has ruled. “To have it resolved, and definitive resolved, was a big relief,” Kalven said.

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“I’m a writer, a journalist,” said Jamie Kalven in court Wednesday. (Courtesy of WGN)

Should Jamie Kalven, the reporter who broke the story of the Laquan McDonald shooting, be forced, under oath, to reveal his sources? 

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Two former Chicago Police officers and one current officer pleaded not guilty to charges they conspired to cover for former cop Jason Van Dyke in the shooting of 16-year old Laquan McDonald.

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A Cook County special prosecutor has indicted three Chicago police officers on multiple charges in connection with the shooting death of Laquan McDonald in October of 2014. 

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Sharon Fairley, chief administrator of the Civilian Office of Police Accountability.

In the wake of the 2014 shooting of Laquan McDonald, the Independent Police Review Authority, or IPRA, is being replaced by COPA—the Civilian Office of Police Accountability. Sharon Fairley, COPA’s chief administrator, joins us to discuss the transition.

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(Chicago Tonight)

A majority of police officers say their jobs have become more difficult and dangerous in the wake of high-profile deaths of black citizens during police encounters, a new survey by the Pew Research Center reveals.

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Mayor Rahm Emanuel has named former chief deputy U.S. Marshal John P. O’Malley to the Chicago Police Board, which decides the most serious cases of police discipline. 

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Will there be federal charges against the police officers involved in the potential Laquan McDonald cover-up? Find out what U.S. Attorney Zachary Fardon has to say about his office's role in prosecuting police misconduct.

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