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An African penguin chick hatched Feb. 10 at Lincoln Park Zoo, pictured here at 21 days old. (Courtesy Lincoln Park Zoo)

On Feb. 10, Lincoln Park Zoo welcomed a new baby bird, the first African penguin chick hatched and reared at the zoo's new penguin habitat. 

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(Urban Wildlife Institute / Chicago Park District)

A camera set up near Rosehill Cemetery captured an unusual photo of a flying squirrel last fall, but the image was only recently discovered.

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Lincoln Park Zoo recently welcomed Talini, a 14-year-old female polar bear who lived previously at the Detroit Zoo. (Roy Lewis / Detroit Zoo)

The 14-year-old female polar bear who recently arrived in Chicago is expected to mate with 8-year-old Siku, who has lived at the zoo since 2016. 

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Ivory seized Feb. 2 from poachers convicted of killing 11 elephants in and around Nouabale-Ndoki National Park in the Republic of Congo. (Z. Labuschagne / Wildlife Conservation Society)

How local scientists played a key role in the arrest of three well-known elephant poachers in the Republic of Congo. 

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A paternity test revealed that Miyagi, one of three male Japanese macaques at Lincoln Park Zoo, is the sire of all four Japanese macaques born at the zoo since 2014. (Todd Rosenberg / Lincoln Park Zoo)

A paternity test to determine the sire of four Japanese macaques born since 2014 at Lincoln Park Zoo came back with a surprising result. 

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(Julia Fuller / Lincoln Park Zoo)

You’ll need to look closely to spot Lincoln Park Zoo’s new baby monkey. The infant, born Oct. 15 to first-time parents, is barely visible as it clings to its mother’s neck.

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(Jill Wagner / Lincoln Park Zoo)

Did you know it’s International Sloth Day? We check in with one of Lincoln Park Zoo’s experts to learn about these furry, slow-moving animals. 

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Lincoln Park Zoo's upcoming Sea Explorer 5-D lets visitors "dive" into the ocean in a virtual submarine. (Courtesy Attraktion!)

A new experience coming this fall to Lincoln Park Zoo will allow visitors “dive” into the ocean and explore landscapes and wildlife at the North and South Poles or in deep ocean waters. 

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Black-crowned night herons average about 2 feet in length and weigh nearly 2 pounds. (Courtesy Lincoln Park Zoo)

The black-crowned night heron is one of the rarest birds in Illinois. Lincoln Park Zoo now hosts a colony of more than 600 herons, but things have getting a bit crowded. 

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(Courtesy Lincoln Park Zoo)

It looks like an art project, but a seven-floor structure at Lincoln Park Zoo is outfitted with logs, bricks, sticks and other materials to provide cozy spaces for insects to nest.

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(Jill Wagner / Lincoln Park Zoo)

Luigi, a 1-year-old Hoffman’s two-toed sloth, is getting settled alongside his new primate neighbors in a mixed-species exhibit.

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(Courtesy of Lincoln Park Zoo)

A trio of newly arrived birds is making noise – lots of it – inside Lincoln Park Zoo’s Dry Thorn Forest exhibit.

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(Courtesy Lincoln Park Zoo)

About a dozen different species were under close watch during the event as scientists looked for any changes in behavior. 

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(Alex Ruppenthal / Chicago Tonight)

Animal behavior experts noticed the biggest change in one particular species during Monday’s eclipse: humans. 

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(Peter Roome / Flickr)

Like scientists across the country, Lincoln Park Zoo’s animal experts will spend Monday’s solar eclipse carefully observing the zoo’s residents for changes in behavior.

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(Chris Bijalba / Lincoln Park Zoo)

The zoo’s newest residents are being hand-reared by keepers, and scientists will analyze their genetics as part of an international species survival plan.

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