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Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center gastroenterologist Dr. Andrew Albert rides home wearing a sign urging people to be screened for colon cancer after one of his patients died and another who had never had a colonoscopy was found to have a tumor. (Courtesy of Dr. Andrew Albert)

After losing a patient to colon cancer, a local doctor strapped a sign to his back urging people to get screened for the disease. The reaction to his unusual move was instant – and widespread.

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A lymphatic vessel (green) inside a Braf-driven primary mouse melanoma tumor. (Manuel Fankhauser and Maria Broggi / EPFL)

University of Chicago researchers have discovered that lymphatic vessels, which are often blamed for enabling cancer to spread, can also boost a type of cancer treatment. 

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Breast cancer survivor Janet Polson at the last year’s Brushes with Cancer gala. (Ben Kurstin)

Everyone who has been touched by cancer has a story to tell. Through Brushes with Cancer, artists find inspiration from those stories to create reflective works of art.

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Meet the Chicago physician who writes about her personal experiences dealing with breast cancer. 

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While Illinois was lauded in a new report for its smoke-free laws and rules on indoor tanning devices, the state is “exceptionally” far behind on comprehensive tobacco-control programs, according to a national cancer advocacy organization.

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(Giuseppe Milo / Flickr)

For black women in Chicago, a breast cancer diagnosis in 2003 meant you were 68 percent more likely to die from the disease than a white woman. A new study shows that gap is closing.

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“The message for cancer patients and survivors is: get active,” said researcher Diane Ehlers. “It’s not a magic cure-all, but we’ve seen many benefits of physical activity for cancer patients and survivors.”

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(COM SALUD / Flickr)

Each year 60 million Americans experience heartburn. A nonprofit now hopes stronger labeling on over-the-counter medicines for heartburn will increase awareness of its association with esophageal cancer.

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The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force is revising its recommendations on prostate cancer screenings, including its position on the controversial PSA test.

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(Courtesy Joyce Endresen)

A new treatment for a deadly form of brain cancer is seeing dramatic study results. “When I first started, less than 10 percent of patients with glioblastoma were alive at five years. Now we’re at 12 to 15 percent,” said Roger Stupp, a neuro-oncologist at Northwestern University. 

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Colorectal cancer is increasing among younger adults despite an overall decrease in the disease in the U.S., according to a new study.  A local doctor talks about the disease and the importance of screening.

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(Yale Rosen / Flickr)

For some cancer patients who have run out of treatment options, a nationwide study may be a beacon of hope by providing them with more access to targeted anti-cancer drugs.

Method Could be Used to Treat Other Diseases

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Northwestern University synthetic biologists have developed a technology for engineering customized immune cells to build programmable therapeutics. (Credit: Image by Joshua Leonard and Kelly Schwarz, Northwestern University. Cell image by NIAID/NIH via Flickr)

A new study offers a possible look at the future of fighting cancer and other diseases that suppress the immune system.

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Ben Stiller (Michael Schilling / Wikimedia Commons)

Earlier this month Ben Stiller revealed he was treated for prostate cancer in 2014 and credited the PSA test with saving his life. Stiller’s surgeon talks about prostate cancer testing and the controversy surrounding the PSA test.

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A new form of cancer treatment developed by University of Chicago scientists was so effective in studies that one researcher said it’d be a “breakthrough” if it were replicated in humans. 

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The Cancer Moonshot initiative being led by Vice President Joe Biden aims to accelerate the pace of cancer research and the development of new treatments. We talk to the University of Chicago professor who is a key player in that effort.