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Herman White has been working at Fermilab for more than 40 years.

Since 1967, a laboratory just outside Chicago has been pushing the boundaries of scientific discovery. We go for a look.

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SpaceX's Falcon 9, left, and Blue Origin's New Shepard. (SpaceX / Flickr, Franke360 / Wikimedia)

Tech billionaire Elon Musk wants to create a colony on Mars. Assessing the challenges–and his chances of success.

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Fermilab's Physics Slam in 2013.

You've probably heard of a poetry slam, but this weekend, Fermilab will present its fifth annual Physics Slam in downtown Chicago. Learn more.

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Chicago Science Festival 2015. (Monica Metzler / Illinois Science Council)

The second annual festival promises a treat for the scientifically curious, whether your interests lie in psychology and neuroscience or Chicago's urban wildlife and HBO's popular "Game of Thrones" series.

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The bison herd at Fermilab just got a little bigger: On Tuesday, the first bison calf of 2016 was born at the particle physics laboratory in suburban Batavia.

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A new study shows why Neanderthal DNA can be bad for you. Astronomers capture visual evidence of an exploding star. And sometimes, it’s a bad idea to go to the Internet for help. Rabiah Mayas from the Museum of Science and Industry joins “Chicago Tonight” to examine these stories and more.

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Scientists at the University of Chicago are hoping a new, highly sensitive camera they're developing for the South Pole Telescope will reveal new information about the early universe. The camera measures something that's nearly 14 billion years old: radiation left over from the Big Bang.

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Its Tevatron particle collider may have been superseded by the Large Hadron Collider in Cern, Switzerland, but Fermilab remains at the cutting edge of research into the origins of the cosmos.

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Scientists at west suburban Fermilab have installed the final piece on a massive particle detector called NOvA that may answer some very big questions. We go deep underground to uncover how the contraption might do that. Read an article.
 

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We take a tour of the MINOS underground facility and watch the installation of the last NOvA Far Detector module. Read a behind-the-scenes blog and view a slideshow.

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It’s the world’s most powerful digital camera and it sits atop the Blanco telescope in the Andes Mountains of Chile. But it was constructed on the campus of Fermilab in far west suburban Batavia. The Dark Energy Camera officially began its work on August 31 and has already captured some amazing images of outer space. Its real mission, though, is to help scientists figure out if so-called Dark Energy is responsible for the universe’s accelerating expansion. We learn how the camera is helping scientists unravel one of the greatest mysteries in the cosmos. Watch videos and view a slideshow.

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Physicists at the largest particle accelerator in the world are set to announce their findings on the Higgs particle on Wednesday. Fermilab's Rob Roser joins us to discuss Fermilab's own results and what to expect tomorrow.

Asteroids, Peanut Allergies, Fossils & Dark Energy

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Neil Shubin

Hollywood loves it when giant rocks fall from space, but scientists assure us that the asteroid passing close to Earth tonight will NOT hit us. We have a close encounter with our science guy, Neil Shubin, who also has a little show-and-tell with a huge fossil.

Penguins, ADHD, Tevatron & Leonardo da Vinci

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Neil Shubin

Sniffing out relatives? It may not be the human way, but it works for one finely dressed bird. We explore penguin behavior and more in tonight's Scientific Chicago.

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MINOS far detector. Image credit: Fermilab

Did European scientists do the impossible and exceed the speed of light? They say they did; now west suburban Fermilab will conduct its own experiments on this. Eddie Arruza talks with a Fermilab scientist about the speed of light and what it all means.