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Construction gets underway this week on the Argyle Streetscape project in Uptown, which will create a first-of-its-kind Chicago street that's shared among bikes, cars, and pedestrians. The city has also announced a discounted Divvy bike share membership rate for lower-income Chicagoans, and it's currently adding protected lanes to encourage more bicycling. We'll take a closer look.

12-Hour Performance to Feature 32 Greek Tragedies

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Last summer, Sean Graney, founder of The Hypocrites, debuted All Our Tragic, his lengthy adaptation of every extant Greek tragedy. As the performance returns to the stage, we revisit our story on the 12-hour play.

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Facing a budget crunch, Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle is proposing a 1 percent hike to the county sales tax. She'll likely face a tough time finding the nine board member votes she needs to get the tax passed. Preckwinkle joins Chicago Tonight to talk about the budget.

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With a fast-approaching debt payment due to the International Monetary Fund and no deal in sight, the world waits to see whether cash-strapped Greece will remain a part of the Euro currency. And here at home, massive pension debts and political battles are complicating budget deals for the state of Illinois and city of Chicago. We talk with two economists about both local and global economic issues.

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Mayor Rahm Emanuel joins Chicago Tonight to talk about the pension payment owed by CPS next week, the school system and city's budget deficits, and whether he expects any good news from Springfield.

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We speak to Mayo Clinic's Dr. Jacqueline Thielen about developments in women's health including some of the best treatment options for menopause.

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Multi-Grammy Award winner, singer Dianne Reeves, visits Chicago Tonight to perform and discuss the scholarship Gala that brings her to town.

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Its Tevatron particle collider may have been superseded by the Large Hadron Collider in Cern, Switzerland, but Fermilab remains at the cutting edge of research into the origins of the cosmos.

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For the third time in six seasons, the Chicago Blackhawks are Stanley Cup Champions. Duncan Keith is the playoff MVP and scores the game-winning goal in the decisive Game 6. Associated Press National Sportswriter Jim Litke joins us to talk about how they did it, put the team's accomplishments in historical perspective, and look at whether or not they could do it again next year.

Colorful Factory Brings Green Tech to Pullman

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For the first time in 30 years, a brand-new factory has opened in the historic Pullman neighborhood. We took an inside look at how the Method soap is made and find out why it’s so important to the neighborhood. 

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Celebrate the Blues in Grant Park; visit The Barack Obama Presidential Library; and sample the best ribs in town. Chicago Tonight has your weekend picks.

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Now that the temperature has warmed up, we’re ready to plant the seeds and transplants for our summer crops.

The Organic Gardener Jeanne Nolan visits our garden to help us plant our latest round of viewer selected crops and check in on the crops we planted a month ago.

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Now that the temperature has warmed up, we’re ready to plant the seeds and transplants for our summer crops. The Organic Gardener Jeanne Nolan visits our garden to help us plant our latest round of viewer selected crops and check in on the crops we planted a month ago.  

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Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan plans to bring a workers’ compensation reform measure to the floor Thursday when the House returns to session. It’s the latest move in an ongoing fight over workers’ comp reform between Democrats and Gov. Bruce Rauner. We take a look at what Rauner's proposing, whether it has any chance of passage, and how workers’ comp has already been reformed in Illinois.

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Robert Ryan was an Oscar-nominated actor best known for roles in The Wild Bunch and The Dirty Dozen. The Chicago Reader’s J.R. Jones’ new biography of the Chicago actor looks at the political activism behind the actor’s tough-guy onscreen persona.

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We live in a digital world. We communicate with each other through tweets and Facebook posts, upload photos to Instagram, pay our bills online, and more. But what happens to all those digital files and accounts after we die? We discuss planning for your digital afterlife.