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Researchers have created a tool that can predict language learning in deaf children after they receive a cochlear implant. Prediction is just the first step, says Dr. Nancy Young. “We’re trying to create precision therapy.”

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Bill Bucklew (center) is walking 2,500 miles across the country to raise funds and awareness for Parkinson’s disease. (Courtesy of Bill and Heidi Bucklew)

Bill Bucklew is walking 2,500 miles across the country to raise awareness of Parkinson’s disease and funds to find a cure. It’s a condition he knows well: In 2012, he was diagnosed with the disease at the age of 43.

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“Hamilton” star Miguel Cervantes and a group of children demonstrate the “My Shot” pose used in the viral campaign started by Cervantes and his wife, Kelly, to raise awareness and funds for epilepsy research. (CURE: Citizens United for Research in Epilepsy / Facebook)

Inspired by the song “My Shot,” from the blockbuster musical, actor Miguel Cervantes is challenging the public to take their “shot” and help raise awareness and funds to find a cure for epilepsy. 

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People with early stage Parkinson’s disease could benefit from high-intensity exercise, according to a first-of-its-kind study which found that it decreased the worsening of motor symptoms when performed three times a week.

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The new Silver Search program provides education and resources to help locate people who have Alzheimer’s disease or dementia when they go missing.

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“Hamilton” star Miguel Cervantes and a group of children demonstrate the “My Shot” pose used in the viral campaign started by Cervantes and his wife, Kelly, to raise awareness and funds for epilepsy research. (CURE: Citizens United for Research in Epilepsy / Facebook)

Inspired by the song “My Shot,” from the blockbuster musical, actor Miguel Cervantes is challenging the public to take their “shot” and help raise awareness and funds to find a cure for epilepsy. 

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The civil rights advocate announced Friday that he was diagnosed with the progressive degenerative disorder in 2015. 

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Football may be America’s favorite sport, but with the rising fear of brain injury and CTE, it’s taken a bruising. We visit a Chicago-area helmet maker to see how it’s tackling the issue. 

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Is there a connection between losing the ability to smell and a greater risk of dementia? A co-author of a new University of Chicago study says it “may be an important early sign.” 

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Your mother was right to tell you to eat your broccoli. Eating nutrient-rich foods like broccoli, spinach and kale could slow age-related cognitive decline, according to a new study.

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Older adults who say their lives have meaning are more likely to get a good night’s sleep and less likely to suffer from sleep apnea and restless leg syndrome, according to a new study.

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(Courtesy Joyce Endresen)

A new treatment for a deadly form of brain cancer is seeing dramatic study results. “When I first started, less than 10 percent of patients with glioblastoma were alive at five years. Now we’re at 12 to 15 percent,” said Roger Stupp, a neuro-oncologist at Northwestern University. 

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Manganese is one of the materials processed at a refinery in Worsley, Australia. (Courtesy of South32)

Federal limits for exposure to manganese might not be adequate to protect public health, says a Washington University neurologist. 

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Deep sleep is vital to memory and decreases with age. Playing pink noise – described as a waterfall-like sound – in sync with a person’s brain waves was found to enhance deep sleep and sleep-dependent memory retention in older adults, according to a new Northwestern study.

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How as a society should we define responsibility and free will? A new book by Chicago-based journalist Kevin Davis explores these issues.

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Women perform better than men on memory tests used to diagnose Alzheimer’s disease, according to a recent study. But could this mental advantage be masking early markers of the disease in women?