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In the early 1960s, bald eagles were nearly extinct in the lower 48 states. But government protections and conservation measures have had a huge impact on their numbers. “I think it’s an incredible success story,” said biologist Chris Anchor.

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(iStock.com)

A state senator has proposed legislation that would partially ban the use of lead-based ammunition, but one gun rights group is calling the bill “a blatant attack” on the rights of hunters.

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Western pond turtle (Courtesy of Yosemite National Park)

The tale of the Western pond turtle was one of several success stories shared with donors Monday evening at a Shedd Aquarium event focused on conservation efforts nationwide. 

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A new WTTW web series peeks into pockets of nature in cities across the country.

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(© Shedd Aquarium / Sam Cejtin)

Shedd Aquarium researchers are studying queen conch populations in the Bahamas to understand the decline of the popular snail in the Caribbean. 

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After 20 years in the fashion industry, Owen Deutsch wasn’t planning on getting back into photography. But then he discovered a new subject: birds.

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Pete Marra appears on Chicago Tonight with host Phil Ponce on Feb. 1.

Last month, ornithologist Pete Marra sat down with Chicago Tonight to discuss his book detailing outdoor cats’ impact on U.S. bird populations. It was an interview that stirred up emotions on all sides. 

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(Shedd Aquarium)

For the fifth year, members of Shedd Aquarium's Animal Response Team participated in a rescue mission of endangered penguin chicks in South Africa. Learn about their work.

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Neil Shubin has traveled the world in search of fossils to help better understand evolutionary origins. He tells us about his latest research on Earth’s southernmost continent.

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(Todd Rosenberg / Lincoln Park Zoo)

Siku the polar bear wants a floating stone. Bella the baby guerilla wants carrots. The holiday season has passed, but Chicago zoo animals are still hoping for gifts.

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(Courtesy of the Field Museum)

A Smithsonian ornithologist says outdoor cats are devastating bird populations.

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Geoffrey Baer solves the mystery of a viewer’s “vague memory” from the 1940s, revisits an exhibit at the Century of Progress and opens the door to the Evanston History Center.

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Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum's alligator snapping turtle, Patsy McNasty, moved into a bigger tank Jan. 19. (Alex Ruppenthal / Chicago Tonight)

Alligator snapping turtle Patsy McNasty moved into a new 300-gallon tank this week at Chicago's Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum, where visitors attended a “housewarming” event for the 14-pound turtle. 

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A long-eared owl (Courtesy of Rob Curtis)

Why are there so many long-eared owls showing up in Chicago this winter? Bird watchers call it an “irruption.”

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A regal fritillary butterfly, a local species that’s classified as threatened in Illinois.

Over the course of its history, the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum has amassed a collection of about 390,000 animal specimens and artifacts. We get a close look at five of these rarely seen items.

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K-9 Officer Marlo served with the Oak Brook Police Department from 1993-2000. (Randy Mucha)

Thanks to a new state law, officers partnered with a police dog are first in line to keep the dog once it is deemed no longer fit for service.