|
The 50th on the Lake motel was operating on Lake Shore Drive by 1958. After several transformations, it’s known today as the Lake Shore Hotel. (Courtesy of Jacob Kaplan)

For nearly a decade, the website Forgotten Chicago has documented the city’s storied past. Meet the site’s co-founder and editor, Jacob Kaplan.

|
(Ken Lund / Flickr)

Should Chicago annex the suburbs to save its shrinking population? Why one author thinks that might be a good idea.

|
Demolition of one of the Robert Taylor Homes. (Daniel X. O'Neil / Flickr)

The Chicago Housing Authority is playing catch-up on a goal it planned to meet eight years ago. We speak with CHA CEO Eugene Jones about the city’s public housing plans.

|
St. Helen's Catholic Church in Ukrainian Village. (Courtesy of Dan O'Brien)

Dan O’Brien has embarked on what he calls his “Lenten architectural pilgrimage” for about 10 years. “The artistic effort that was put into designing these spaces ... were all meant to tell a story,” he says.

|
(Daniel Huizinga / Flickr)

The mighty Chicago flag gets a special shout-out in City Council just in time for its 100th birthday. We mark Chicago Flag Day by exploring its evolving design, history and popularity.

|
From left: Works by Charles Dawson, Lee Godie, and Dorothy and Otis Shepard.(Courtesy of the Terra Foundation for American Art)

A new art initiative in Chicago will include dozens of exhibitions and hundreds of public programs in 2018.

|
Sam Lay (Courtesy “Sam Lay in Bluesland”)

Celebrating the life and musical legacy of Chicago blues legend Sam Lay.

|
Alexander Calder, “Flamingo” (vincent desjardins / Flickr)

This week, a significant work by artist Alexander Calder was dismantled from the lobby of the Willis Tower and is being moved into storage. Ward Miller of Preservation Chicago says a second major Calder work may also be in danger of disappearing.

|

While the end of Meyers Ace Hardware is certainly a loss to its South Side community, it’s also leaving a piece of Chicago’s jazz history hanging in the balance.

|
View from the south west corner of Dearborn and Monroe, 1871. (Jex Bardwell / Chicago History Museum)

Nearly 150 years after a small barn fire ballooned into a two-day blaze that engulfed the city, the story of the Great Chicago Fire is being retold. On social media.

|
From the exhibition “Kings and Queens: Pinball, Imagists and Chicago.” (James Prinz / Elmhurst Art Museum)

Pinball machines and Ed Paschke paintings go side by side as a suburban museum becomes an artful arcade.

|

This year, the group’s annual list of endangered structures sounds the alarm on not just buildings, but also public art. 

|
Malcolm X College door painting by Eugene Eda Wade. (Photo by Lee Bey)

Two new shows at the Chicago Cultural Center open doors to a local arts movement from 50 years ago.

|

Geoffrey Baer explores why hot dogs and ketchup don’t mix in Chicago.

|
More than 1,000 trains travel on Roosevelt Road every day. (Trains Magazine)

Editors from Trains Magazine tell us why Chicago is America's railroad capital.

|

A stunning confession in the most notorious civil rights case of the 20th century.